Mary (Unknown)1

F, #36099, b. circa 1778
     Mary (Unknown) was born circa 1778 at Smarden, Kent, EnglandG.1
     As of before 1811,her married name was Featherstone.2 She was the head of household in the census on on 30 March 1851 living at at Pratling Street, Aylesford, Kent, EnglandG, occupation a Widow aged 73.2

Family 2

Child
Last Edited28 Nov 2012

Citations

  1. [S1851] National for England & Wales, "1851 census HO107/1612/60/6
    Pratling Street, Aylesford, Kent
    Mary Featherstone head W 73 Kent, Smarden
    James Featherstone grandson 16 ag lab Aylesford, Kent
    Charles Featherstone grandson 13 ag lab Aylesford, Kent.
    "
  2. [S1851] National for England & Wales, "1851 census HO107/1612/60/6
    Pratling Street, Aylesford, Kent
    Mary Featherstone head W 73 Kent, Smarden
    James Featherstone grandson 16 ag lab Aylesford, Kent
    Charles Featherstone grandson 13 ag lab Aylesford, Kent."

(Unknown) Featherstone1

M, #36100

Family

Mary (Unknown) b. c 1778
Last Edited28 Nov 2012

Citations

  1. [S1851] National for England & Wales, "1851 census HO107/1612/60/6
    Pratling Street, Aylesford, Kent
    Mary Featherstone head W 73 Kent, Smarden
    James Featherstone grandson 16 ag lab Aylesford, Kent
    Charles Featherstone grandson 13 ag lab Aylesford, Kent."

John Featherstone1

M, #36101, b. circa 1780
     John Featherstone was born circa 1780.1 He married Mary (Unknown) before 1809.1

Family

Mary (Unknown) b. c 1780
Child
Last Edited13 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S876] As per use web image, Church of Jesus Christ Latterday Saints, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America, name:     Thomas Francis Featherstone
    gender:     Male
    baptism/christening date:     03 Dec 1808
    baptism/christening place:     CAWOOD,YORK,ENGLAND
    father's name:     John Featherstone
    mother's name:     Mary
    indexing project (batch) number:     C10913-2
    system origin:     England-ODM
    source film number:     991187.

Thomas Featherstone1

M, #36102, b. circa 1730
     Thomas Featherstone was born circa 1730.1 He married Mary (Unknown) before 1759.1,2

Family

Mary (Unknown) b. c 1750
Children
Last Edited13 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S876] As per use web image, Church of Jesus Christ Latterday Saints, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America, name:     George Featherstone
    gender:     Male
    baptism/christening date:     18 Jun 1775
    baptism/christening place:     GREATFORD,LINCOLN,ENGLAND
    father's name:     Thos Featherstone
    mother's name:     Mary
    indexing project (batch) number:     C02868-2
    system origin:     England-ODM
    source film number:     432514.
  2. [S876] As per use web image, Church of Jesus Christ Latterday Saints, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America, name:     Elizth Featherstone
    gender:     Female
    baptism/christening date:     11 Apr 1759
    baptism/christening place:     GREATFORD,LINCOLN,ENGLAND
    father's name:     Thomas Featherstone
    mother's name:     Mary
    indexing project (batch) number:     C02868-2
    system origin:     England-ODM
    source film number:     432514.
  3. [S876] As per use web image, Church of Jesus Christ Latterday Saints, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America, name:     Thomas Featherstone
    gender:     Male
    baptism/christening date:     21 Oct 1770
    baptism/christening place:     GREATFORD,LINCOLN,ENGLAND
    father's name:     Thomas Featherstone
    mother's name:     Mary
    indexing project (batch) number:     C02868-2
    system origin:     England-ODM
    source film number:     432514.

Mary (Unknown)1

F, #36103, b. circa 1750
     Mary (Unknown) was born circa 1750.1 She married Thomas Featherstone before 1759.1,2
     As of before 1775,her married name was Featherstone.1

Family

Thomas Featherstone b. c 1730
Children
Last Edited29 Nov 2012

Citations

  1. [S876] As per use web image, Church of Jesus Christ Latterday Saints, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America, name:     George Featherstone
    gender:     Male
    baptism/christening date:     18 Jun 1775
    baptism/christening place:     GREATFORD,LINCOLN,ENGLAND
    father's name:     Thos Featherstone
    mother's name:     Mary
    indexing project (batch) number:     C02868-2
    system origin:     England-ODM
    source film number:     432514.
  2. [S876] As per use web image, Church of Jesus Christ Latterday Saints, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America, name:     Elizth Featherstone
    gender:     Female
    baptism/christening date:     11 Apr 1759
    baptism/christening place:     GREATFORD,LINCOLN,ENGLAND
    father's name:     Thomas Featherstone
    mother's name:     Mary
    indexing project (batch) number:     C02868-2
    system origin:     England-ODM
    source film number:     432514.
  3. [S876] As per use web image, Church of Jesus Christ Latterday Saints, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America, name:     Thomas Featherstone
    gender:     Male
    baptism/christening date:     21 Oct 1770
    baptism/christening place:     GREATFORD,LINCOLN,ENGLAND
    father's name:     Thomas Featherstone
    mother's name:     Mary
    indexing project (batch) number:     C02868-2
    system origin:     England-ODM
    source film number:     432514.

Elizabeth Featherstone1

F, #36104, b. 11 April 1759
Father*Thomas Featherstone1 b. c 1730
Mother*Mary (Unknown)1 b. c 1750
     Elizabeth Featherstone was baptized on 11 April 1759 at Greatford, Lincolnshire, EnglandG.1 She was the daughter of Thomas Featherstone and Mary (Unknown).1
Last Edited29 Nov 2012

Citations

  1. [S876] As per use web image, Church of Jesus Christ Latterday Saints, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America, name:     Elizth Featherstone
    gender:     Female
    baptism/christening date:     11 Apr 1759
    baptism/christening place:     GREATFORD,LINCOLN,ENGLAND
    father's name:     Thomas Featherstone
    mother's name:     Mary
    indexing project (batch) number:     C02868-2
    system origin:     England-ODM
    source film number:     432514.

Thomas Featherstone1

M, #36105, b. 1770, d. September 1846
Father*Thomas Featherstone2 b. c 1730
Mother*Mary (Unknown)2 b. c 1750
     Thomas Featherstone was baptized in 1770 at Greatford, Lincolnshire, EnglandG.3 He was born circa 1771 at Lincolnshire, EnglandG.4 He was the son of Thomas Featherstone and Mary (Unknown).2 Thomas Featherstone married Jane Spencer on 14 November 1797 at Parish Church, Wilsthorpe, Lincolnshire, EnglandG.5,6 Thomas Featherstone His death was registered in the Spalding registration district in the quarter of September 1846 Vol./Page 14.448 Is this his death?1
     He was the head of household in the Census on 6 June 1841 living at Thurby Village, Thurby, Lincolnshire, EnglandG.4

Family

Jane Spencer b. c 1771, d. Dec 1860
Children
Last Edited7 Jan 2017

Citations

  1. [S3] As per use, death registration index, death index.
  2. [S876] As per use web image, Church of Jesus Christ Latterday Saints, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America, name:     Thomas Featherstone
    gender:     Male
    baptism/christening date:     21 Oct 1770
    baptism/christening place:     GREATFORD,LINCOLN,ENGLAND
    father's name:     Thomas Featherstone
    mother's name:     Mary
    indexing project (batch) number:     C02868-2
    system origin:     England-ODM
    source film number:     432514.
  3. [S876] As per use web image, Church of Jesus Christ Latterday Saints, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America, name:     Thomas Featherstone
    gender:     Male
    baptism/christening date:     1770
    baptism/christening place:     GREATFORD, LINCOLN, ENGLAND
    father's name:     Thomas Featherstone
    mother's name:     Mary
    indexing project (batch) number:     C02868-3
    system origin:     England-VR
    source film number:     1450468.
  4. [S1841] Census filmed for England & Wales, "1841 census
    RG number:HO107 Piece:623 Book/Folio:5/19 Page:12
    Reg. District:Bourn Sub District:Bourn
    Parish: Thurlby
    Address: Thurlby, Thurlby, Lincolnshire
    FEATHERSTON, Thomas M 70 1771 Lincolnshire
    FEATHERSTON, Jane F 70 1771 Lincolnshire
    FEATHERSTON, James M 35 1806 G.L.(general labourer)? Lincolnshire
    CHAPPELL, Elizabeth F 75 1766."
  5. [S1270] Marriage Licence for see citation and see Citation, see citation "Year:      1797
    Groom Forenames:      Thomas
    Groom Surname:      FEATHERSTONE
    Groom's parish:      From elsewhere
    Groom's condition:      Single
    Groom's age:      21
    Bride Forenames:      Jane
    Bride Surname:      SPENCER
    Bride's parish:      Of the parish
    Bride's condition:      Single
    Bride's age:      26
    Place of marriage:      Wilsthorpe
    Diocese:      Lincoln
    Country:      England
    Checked:      Y
    Notes:      
    RO Reference:      MB 1797/87&88
    Record source:      Lincolnshire Marriage Licence Bonds and Allegation
    Data provider:      Lincolnshire Family History Society."
  6. [S932] Webpage findmypast.co.uk (http://www.findmypast.co.uk) "Day:      14
    Month:      Nov
    Year:      1797
    Groom Forename(s):      Thomas
    Groom Surname:      Featherstone
    Bride Forename(s):      Jane
    Bride Surname:      Spencer
    Parish:      Wilsthorpe
    Deanery:      Aveland & Ness
    County:      Lincolnshire
    Notes:      Lic/ TF Greatford
    Record source:      Lincolnshire Marriage Index
    Data provider:      Lincolnshire Family History Society."
  7. [S266] Parish register Microfilm Transcript, As per citation, 1837-1911 "Copy of an entry of marriage in the registration district of Nottingham from the registers of St Mary
    1855 Marriage solemnized at the Parish Church in the Parish of St Mary in the County of Nottingham.
    No. 475
    March 1st 1855
    Charles Spencer Featherston of Full age a widower, cattle dealer of Bourne in the County of Lincoln, father Thomas Featherston a Farmer
    To
    Kezia Cook of full age a spinster of Glass house Street father Thomas Cook a farmer
    Married in the Parish Church according to the Rights of the Established Church by licence by me T R Matthews, curate
    Both Signed in the presence of Richard Frank Bingham and Ann Darby Hind."

William A H Ashplant1

M, #36106, b. 18 December 1907, d. circa November 1990
     William A H Ashplant was born on 18 December 1907 at Fulham, London, London, EnglandG.2,3 Annie Caroline Featherstone and William A H Ashplant marriage was registered in Fulham district Vol/Page 1a.699 in the quarter of March 1932.1 He died circa November 1990 at Maidstone, Kent, EnglandG, aged 82.4
     Kent Database; Y.

Family

Annie Caroline Featherstone b. 16 Apr 1909, d. Nov 1996
Last Edited1 Nov 2013

Citations

  1. [S2] As per use, Index of Marriage as per use, Civil Registration event: Marriage
    MarriageFinder: Annie C Featherstone married William A H Ashplant
    Name:      FEATHERSTONE, Annie C
    Registration district:      Fulham
    County:      London
    Year of registration:      1932
    Quarter of registration:      Jan-Feb-Mar
    Spouse's last name:      Ashplant
    Volume no:      1A
    Page no:      699
         
    Name:      ASHPLANT, William A H
    Registration district:      Fulham
    County:      London
    Year of registration:      1932
    Quarter of registration:      Jan-Feb-Mar
    Spouse's last name:      Featherstone
    Volume no:      1A
    Page no:      699 (1837-1965).
  2. [S1] As per person, Index of Births various (see entry), birth registration index William Alfred H Ashplant Mar 1908 Fulham LDN 1a 347
    (1837-2010).
  3. [S3] As per use, death registration index, death registration index William Alfred H Ashplant
    Birth Date: 18 December 1907
    Nov 1990 Maidstone KEN 16 1422 age 82.
  4. [S3] As per use, death registration index, death registration index William Alfred H Ashplant
    Birth Date: 18 December 1907
    Nov 1990 Maidstone KEN 16 1422 age 82.

Emma Palmer1

F, #36107, b. circa 1833
     Emma Palmer was born circa 1833.1
     Kent Database; Y. As of December 1852,her married name was Featherston.2
Last Edited11 Jul 2016
ReferenceP8439

Citations

  1. [S1337] Marriage Transcript, St Matthew, City Road, 1837-2011 "marriage solemnized at the parish church of St Matthew, City Road in the county of Middlesex
    31 December 1852
    John Peter Featherston of full age widower gentleman of Twiston Square father Jonathon Featherston a??? surgeon
    Emma Palmer 19 spinster of 10 New Charles Street father Daniel Palmer lighterman
    married in the parish church by licence
    both signed in the presence of Emma Ellen Roberts and Hannah Rowell.
    "
  2. [S2] As per use, Index of Marriage as per use (1837-1965).

John Featherston1

M, #36108, b. circa 1779, d. before 1852
     John Featherston was born circa 1779.1 He died before 1852.2

Family

Child
Last Edited13 Nov 2014

Citations

  1. [S433] Image Marriage, St Pancras, upto 2012 "marriage solemnized at St Pancras Church in the parish of St Pancras in the county of Middlesex
    December 12th 1852
    Philip Fetherston full age bachelor labourer of Prospect Place father John Fetherston dead
    Diana Hall full age spinster of Prospect Place father John Hale dead
    married in the parish church after banns, Philip signed Diana made her mark in the presence of Willim Mansell and Mary Mansell.
    "
  2. [S433] Image Marriage, St Pancras, upto 2012 "marriage solemnized at St Pancras Church in the parish of St Pancras in the county of Middlesex
    December 12th 1852
    Philip Fetherston full age bachelor labourer of Prospect Place father John Fetherston dead
    Diana Hall full age spinster of Prospect Place father John Hale dead
    married in the parish church after banns, Philip signed Diana made her mark in the presence of Willim Mansell and Mary Mansell."

Mary Featherstone1

F, #36109, b. circa 1783
     Mary Featherstone was born circa 1783.1 She was buried on 18 May 1831 at Christchurch, Southwark, London, Surrey, EnglandG, Aged 48.2
     Kent Database; Y. She lived before 18 May 1831 at Marlborough Street, England.1
Last Edited20 Mar 2013
ReferenceP8435

Citations

  1. [S507] Burial Transcript, Christ Church, Lambeth, unknown period "Christchurch, Surrey
    Mary Featherstone of Marlborough Street buried May 18 1831 age 48."
  2. [S1292] Burial Transcript, Christ Church, Southwark, Surrey, unknown period "Christchurch, Surrey
    Mary Featherstone of Marlborough Street buried May 18 1831 age 48."

Harriet Morgan1

F, #36110, b. circa 1790
     Harriet Morgan was born circa 1790.1
     Kent Database; Y. As of 13 October 1814,her married name was Featherstone.1

Family

Phillip Featherstone
Child
Last Edited2 Mar 2015
ReferenceP8434

Citations

  1. [S358] Marriages: Lambeth Sep 1882, unknown repository, St Mary, Lambeth, Surrey
    Philip Fetherstone a bachellor of the parish of Christchurch in this county and Harriet Morgan a spinster of this parish were married in this church by licence this thirteenth day of October 1814 both signed (Philip as Philip Fetherston) in the presence of Chas King and John Morgan.
  2. [S557] Microfilm Marriage, St Mary Magdalene in the city of London, 1837-2010 "marriage solemnized at the Parish Church in the parish of St Mary Magdalen in the City of London
    2nd February 1854
    Francis Morgan Featherston full age bachelor commercial clerk 11 Little Knight Rider St father Philip Featherston commerce clerk
    Charlotte Amelia Dovell full age spinster 11 Little Knight Rider St father Nathaniel Dovell Custom House Agent
    married in the parish church after banns
    both signed in the presence of Marguerite Anne Milnes and Robt Dye
    signature of Francis Morgan spells Fetherston."

Henry Fetherston1

M, #36111, b. 28 October 1794
Father*Philip Featherstone1
Mother*Sarah Ayre1
     Henry Fetherston was born on 28 October 1794 at Southwark, London, Surrey, EnglandG.1 He was the son of Philip Featherstone and Sarah Ayre.1 Henry Fetherston was baptized on 21 November 1794 at St George the Martyr, Southwark, London, Surrey, EnglandG.1
     Kent Database; Y.
Last Edited20 Mar 2013
ReferenceP8433

Citations

  1. [S576] Not given, baptism register: baptism in the church of St George the Martyr, Southwark in the county of Surrey 1794
    21 November Henry son of Philip and Sarah Fetherston born 28 October
    , Ancestry Web site.

Eileen Elizabeth Stone1

F, #36112, b. June 1938, d. 31 August 2010
     Eileen Elizabeth Stone was born on 25 April 1938 at Surrey, EnglandG.1 She Her Birth was registered in the Surrey North Eastern district in the quarter of June 1938 Vol/Page at 2a.170.1 She and Brian Gordon Featherstone were Married at Merton Park Baptist Church, Merton, Surrey, EnglandG, in 1958.1 Brian Gordon Featherstone and Eileen Elizabeth Stone marriage was registered in Surrey North Eastern district Vol/Page 5g.875 in the quarter of June 1958.2,3 She died on 31 August 2010.1 She's Obitutary appeared in United Kingdom and Ireland Obituary Collection
about Eileen Elizabeth Featherstone
Name of Deceased: Eileen Elizabeth Featherstone
Gender: F (Female)
Death Date: 31 Aug 2010
Cause of Death: Cancer
Obituary Date: 15 Sep 2010
Newspaper Title: Bracknell & Ascot Times
Newspaper Location: Bracknell, Berkshire, England
Children’s' Names: Ltd, Blyth House on 15 September 2010.4
     As of June 1958, Eileen Elizabeth Stone was also known as Eileen E Stone.3 As of June 1958,her married name was Featherstone.2

Family

Brian Gordon Featherstone b. 15 Nov 1932, d. Feb 2001
Last Edited19 Jan 2017

Citations

  1. [S1340] Featherstone Society Member # 200, "Featherstone Society Member # 200," e-mail to W Paul Featherstone, 2012, He married EILEEN ELIZABETH STONE 1958 in Merton Park Baptist Church, Surrey (Jun 1958 Surrey North Eastern SRY 5g 875) (Source: marriage registration index.). She was born 25 April 1938 in Jun 1938 Surrey North Eastern SRY 2a 170 (Source: birth registration index.), and died 31 August 2010.
    birth registration index Eileen E Stone
    Mother's Maiden Surname: Myrtle
    Jun 1938 Surrey North Eastern SRY 2a 170
    memorial service 17 September 2010 Wokingham Methodist Church, Rose Street
    United Kingdom and Ireland Obituary Collection
    about Eileen Elizabeth Featherstone
    Name of Deceased: Eileen Elizabeth Featherstone
    Gender: F (Female)
    Death Date: 31 Aug 2010
    Cause of Death: Cancer
    Obituary Date: 15 Sep 2010
    Newspaper Title: Bracknell & Ascot Times
    Newspaper Location: Bracknell, Berkshire, England
    Children’s' Names: Ltd, Blyth House.
  2. [S1340] Featherstone Society Member # 200, "Featherstone Society Member # 200," e-mail to W Paul Featherstone, 2012, He married EILEEN ELIZABETH STONE 1958 in Merton Park Baptist Church, Surrey (Jun 1958 Surrey North Eastern SRY 5g 875) (Source: marriage registration index.). She was born 25 April 1938 in Jun 1938 Surrey North Eastern SRY 2a 170 (Source: birth registration index.), and died 31 August 2010.
  3. [S2] As per use, Index of Marriage as per use, MarriageFinder: Brian G Featherstone married Eileen E Stone
    Name:      FEATHERSTONE, Brian G
    Registration district:      Surrey North Eastern
    County:      Surrey
    Year of registration:      1958
    Quarter of registration:      Apr-May-Jun
    Spouse's last name:      Stone
    Volume no:      5G
    Page no:      875
         
    Name:      STONE, Eileen E
    Registration district:      Surrey North Eastern
    County:      Surrey
    Year of registration:      1958
    Quarter of registration:      Apr-May-Jun
    Spouse's last name:      Featherstone
    Volume no:      5G
    Page no:      875 (1837-1965).
  4. [S1340] Featherstone Society Member # 200, "Featherstone Society Member # 200," e-mail to W Paul Featherstone, 2012, memorial service 17 September 2010 Wokingham Methodist Church, Rose Street.

Lucy Harwood1

F, #36113
     Y. Kent Database; Y.

Family

Henry Fetherstone b. c 1800, d. Mar 1868
Last Edited20 Mar 2013
ReferenceP8432

Citations

  1. [S242] Churches Various UK, Banns UK, St Mary, Whitechapel, Middlesex
    Banns of marriage read between Henry Fetherston bach and Lucy Harwood spin both of this parish
    Sunday 19th September, 26 September and 3 October 1819.

Sarah Featherstone1

F, #36114, b. circa 1760
     Sarah Featherstone was born circa 1760 at EnglandG.1 She married Samuel Player on 24 October 1781 at Parish Church, Birchanger, Essex, EnglandG.1
     As of 24 October 1781,her married name was Player.1

Family

Samuel Player b. c 1760
Last Edited10 Jun 2016
ReferenceP11388

Citations

  1. [S2186] Image Church Marriage, Birchanger, Essex, unknown period "Birchanger, Essex marriage 24 October 1781 Samuel Player and Sarah Featherstone."

Ann Avery

F, #36115, d. 25 December 1828
     Ann Avery married William Charleton Featherstone, son of (Unknown) (Unknown), on 18 May 1817 at Heavitree, Devonshire, EnglandG. Ann Avery died on 25 December 1828.
     Kent Database; Y. As of 18 May 1817,her married name was Featherstone.

Family

William Charleton Featherstone b. c 1794, d. 3 Feb 1858
Last Edited20 Mar 2013
ReferenceP6967

Hargrave Carroll Featherstone

M, #36116, b. 3 September 1886, d. June 1950
Father*Samuel William Featherstone b. 20 Jul 1855, d. 17 May 1908
Mother*Jenetta Harrison Hargrave Carroll b. 28 May 1864, d. 18 Jan 1930
     Hargrave Carroll Featherstone His Birth was registered in the Tavistock district in the quarter of September 1886 Vol/Page at 5b.365.1 He was the son of Samuel William Featherstone and Jenetta Harrison Hargrave Carroll. Hargrave Carroll Featherstone was born on 3 September 1886 at Whitchurch, Devonshire, EnglandG. He died in June 1950 at Sidmouth, Devonshire, EnglandG.
     Kent Database; Y. He was enumerated as the son of Samuel William Featherstone in the Census on 5 April 1891 Samuel William Featherstone Occupation was a vicar of Whitchurch living at The Vicarage, Whitchurch, Devonshire, EnglandG.2 Hargrave Carroll Featherstone wasenumerated as a Pupil in the Census on 31 March 1901 Head of household Edmund H C Smith Assistant School Master, Clifton College living at Clifton College, College Road, Clifton, Bristol, Gloucestershire, EnglandG.3 He was educated in 1902; Clifton College entry for Hargrave C Featherstone school number 5671 Born 3.9.1886. The entry is mainly in code with no explanation but it could be he left in 1902, to Jesus Camb.
Full name: Hargrave Carroll Featherstone
Born: 1886, Whitchurch, Devon, England
Died: June 1950, Sidmouth, Devon, England
Wicket-keeper
Biography: He changed his name from FC Featherstone
Teams: Devon (Minor Counties Championship: 1906-1934); All teams
Lists of matches and more detailed statistics includes minor countiesgames for Devon from 1906-1934
This page was created by the CricketArchive Oracleshttp://cricketarchive.com/Archive/Players/150/150404/150404.html. He was the head of household in the Census in 1911 Hargrave Carroll Featherstone Occupation was a not found living. He was served Indian Army between 1916 and 1918.4
Last Edited16 May 2017
ReferenceP7088

Citations

  1. [S1] As per person, Index of Births various (see entry), From Family Records Centre Index of Births Collected Jan 1998
    birth registration index Hargrave Carroll Featherstone Sep 1886 Tavistock DEV 5b 365 (1837-2010).
  2. [S1891] National for England & Wales, "1891 census RG12/1750/124/10
    The Vicarage, Whitchurch, Devon
    Samuel William Featherstone head M 35 vicar of Whitchurch Wiltshire, Marlborough
    Jenetta H H Featherstone wife M 26 Ireland, Cork
    Hargrave C Featherstone son 4 Devon, Whitchurch
    Samuel D Featherstone son 2 Devon, Whitchurch
    Alfred William Daw serv U 26 coachman Cornwall, Torpoint
    Mary Ann Bolt serv U 23 cook Devon, Whitchurch
    Anna Luxton serv U 25 nurse Devon, North Tawton
    Maud Mary May serv U 16 kitchen maid Devon, Lamerton."
  3. [S1901] 31.3.1901 Census filmed, unknown repository address, as per citation, 1901 Census
    RG number: RG13 Piece: 2368 Folio: 52 Page: 16      
    Registration District: Bristol Sub District: Clifton
    Enumeration District: 30. Ecclesiastical Parish: Emmanuel Clifton
     Civil Parish: Bristol
    Address: 30, College Road, Bristol, Gloucestershire
    SMITH, Edmund H C Head Married M 47 1854 Assistant School Master Clifton College London Norfolk
    SMITH, Cicely D Wife Married F 27 1874 Worfield Shropshire
    FEATHERSTONE, Hargrave C Pupil Single M 14 1887 Whitchurch Devonshire
    With many others.
  4. [S596] India Office, India Office, British Library, India Office Records: Military Department Records [IOR/L/MIL/09/540 - IOR/L/MIL/09/623]
    Records of the Military Department

    Entry to the military, medical and nursing services of the East India Company's Army (1753-1861) and the Indian Army (1861-1940)

    World War 1 applications for Permanent Commissions in the Indian Army and for appointments to the Indian Army Reserve of Officers

    FILE - Applications for appointments to the India Army Reserve of Officers - ref. IOR/L/MIL/9/561 - date: 1916-1918
    item: Carroll, Featherstone Hargrave- IARO - ref. IOR/L/MIL/9/561/176-81 [n.d.]
    British Library, India Office Records: Military Department Records[IOR/L/MIL/09/540 - IOR/L/MIL/09/623]
    Records of the Military Department
    Entry to the military, medical and nursing services of the East IndiaCompany's Army (1753-1861) and the Indian Army (1861-1940)
    World War 1 applications for Permanent Commissions in the Indian Armyand for appointments to the Indian Army Reserve of Officers
    FILE - Applications for appointments to the India Army Reserve ofOfficers - ref. IOR/L/MIL/9/561 - date: 1916-1918
    item: Carroll, Featherstone Hargrave- IARO - ref.IOR/L/MIL/9/561/176-81 [n.d.].

Julia Marion Featherstone

F, #36117, b. March 1862
Father*Samuel Featherstone b. b 24 May 1831, d. 13 Aug 1883
Mother*Emma Julia Thuell b. c 1836, d. Mar 1919
     Julia Marion Featherstone Her Birth was registered in the Marlborough district in the quarter of March 1862 Vol/Page at 5a.82.1 She was the daughter of Samuel Featherstone and Emma Julia Thuell.
     Kent Database; Y. Julia Marion Featherstone lived in 1891 at Ashley Villa, Williton, Taunton, Somertsetshire, EnglandG. As of 20 April 1893,her married name was Clark.2
Last Edited16 Jun 2017
ReferenceP7086

Citations

  1. [S1] As per person, Index of Births various (see entry), birth registration index Julia Marion Featherstone Mar 1862Marlborough WIL 5a 82 (1837-2010).
  2. [S932] Webpage findmypast.co.uk (http://www.findmypast.co.uk) "First Name JULIA MARION
    Last Name FEATHERSTONE
    Year Of Marriage 1893
    Month Apr
    Day 26
    Place -
    City Or Town -
    Parish Whitchurch
    Bride First Julia Marion
    Bride Last Name Featherstone
    Groom First Name Henry Atwood
    Groom Last Name Clark
    County Devon
    Spouse Forename -
    Spouse Surname -
    Record set Devon Marriages."

Samuel Featherstone

M, #36118, b. 3 May 1807, d. 5 May 1855
Father*Philip Featherstone1 b. 18 Dec 1774, d. Jun 1861
Mother*Ann Squire1 b. c 1770
     Samuel Featherstone was born circa 1807 at Bishops Tawton, Barnstaple, Devonshire, EnglandG. He was baptized on 3 May 1807 at Parish Church, Bishops Tawton, Barnstaple, Devonshire, EnglandG.1 He was the son of Philip Featherstone and Ann Squire.1 Samuel Featherstone married Mary Ball on 15 August 1829 at Parish Church, Swimbridge, Devonshire, EnglandG.2 Samuel Featherstone died on 5 May 1855 at Barque John, Manacles Rock, off St Keverne, Cornwall, EnglandG.3 He's death notice appeared in PLYMOUTH AND STONEHOUSE JOURNAL

Thursday May 10th,1855

FRIGHTFUL SHIPWRECK:

AWFUL LOSS OF HUMAN LIFE

On Saturday morning last, the inhabitants of the three towns were astounded and shocked by the intelligence that the barque John, of this port, Rawle, master, which had only left Plymouth Sound on Thursday afternoon, had struck on the Manacles Rock, off St. Keverne, on the coast of Cornwall, and that upwards of one hundred and ninety of her passengers had been drowned. The intelligence at first appeared to be too frightful to be credited; but it was soon ascertained that the statement was only too true, and that one of the most deplorable shipwrecks that had ever taken place on the western close had occurred.

The John was bound for Quebec, and when she left the Sound about four o'clock on Thursday afternoon, who had on board 154 adult passengers, 98 children, and 16 infants, together in a crew in all of 19, making the total of souls on board 287. The passengers principally from the North of Devon, the great source of American emigration in the West of England, numbers from other parts of this country and the remainder from the counties of Cornwall, Dorset and Somerset, - in fact, she was considered what is termed a West Country ship. Many of the friends accompanied the unfortunate passengers to this port to bid them farewell, and as the vessel left the Sound relatives might be seen here and there on the Hoe, gazing after her with painful interest, or shedding tears at the separation between them and those they loved dearly - a separation which, as the sequel proved, was, in many instances a fatal one. Others put on a bolder front, and sought to infuse some of their own spirits into their friends on board by hearty cheers in which they were joined by some of the spectators, who happened to be present. The ship left at the top of the ebb tide with a favourable wind off the land, and all bid her fare for a prosperous voyage down channel. How their hopes were blighted, it would be impossible to say, so varied are the accounts of those who have been spared to tell the catastrophe. This much, however, we may state that all accounts agree in condemning the captain, who, it is said, had no business to be so close in shore, and who, notwithstanding that he was warned of the danger, stupidly persisted in keeping the vessel in the same course. So embittered were the survivors towards him that it is stated the Coast Guard were obliged to protect him from their fury. But whether this anger arose from a belief that the accident was the result of inattention on his part - or that the captain and crew saved themselves, as stated, to the sacrifice of the passengers - or, in fact, what gave rise to this angry feeling at all, it would be wrong to say until evidence shall be taken as it is easy to imagine that the survivors, many of whom have sustained the loss of their dearest relatives, whilst nearly all have lost the whole of their wealth the possessed, would be embittered, and give vent to their feelings against one to whom they had entrusted their life and property.

The scene after the vessel struck, as may be anticipated, was most distressing, the utmost confusion prevailed, and most of those on board gave themselves up in despair. The account rendered by one of the passengers is most heart-rending, thought the character of all similar disasters, except that human sympathy was in this case the more excited from the number of children on board, and from the extraordinary efforts of their parents to save them from the death impending. One of the passengers, William Walters, a man apparently of sickly and delicate constitution, succeeded as the vessel settled in the water, in taking his wife and six children into the rigging one by one - the youngest, unfortunately, fell from the mother's arms into the sea; the father, though unable to swim, plunged after it, but failed in his noble effort to save his child, and, with difficulty, regained the ship. Another, Wm. Clemence, who had a wife and eight children on board, attempted to raise the six youngest of them into the rigging by the aid of a "sheet", with which he had tied them together. Unfortunately, he failed in his efforts, and four were drowned. Samuel Rogers, a boy aged fifteen, one of the other passengers saved, has lost his father, mother, two brothers, a sister, and a cousin. Henry North, saved, lost his wife and three children.

So far as the facts can be gleaned from the parties on board, it appears that all went prosperously till about half past nine, when they made the Falmouth light, the captain himself pointing it out to one of the passengers on deck. Just at this time the second mate was trying to sight the Lizard light, and he asked some of the passengers if they could not see the reflection of the light in the sky; they replied they could not, when the captain said he could not either, but they would see it fast enough when they got there. It was the second-mate's watch, and the captain shortly after went below. About ten o'clock the mate came on the poop and asked the passengers if they had seen the captain, and on being asked what he wanted the captain for, he said he (the mate) thought they were a deal too nigh the land. Shortly after this the captain came on deck, and what the mate had stated, "that they were getting too close on land," was reported to him; the captain "pooh-poohed" the report. Soon afterward someone forward sung out "rocks," and almost immediately the vessel struck with violence, so much so that she bumped over the rock and then struck, with still greater force upon rocks further in; the captain was then distinctly heard to call out "run her aground". The vessel then had all sail on her with great way, as she was when the accident happened going eight or nine knots, and though ran aground, the sea washed off her again, and she ran down the coast for some distance. An attempt was then made to bring her up by letting go an anchor, when she grounded heavily broadside on. Attention was then directed to the boats - of which she had four on board, three on deck and one over the side - the captain, four seamen, a boy and one passenger, jumped into the latter boat and called out to lower, but finding no one answered the call, the captain returned to the deck of the vessel, when the boat was lowered. On touching the water it was found there was no plug in her, and she was without thowle pins. While they were waiting to supply these deficiencies, her tackle became unhooked, and the boat drifted off from the vessel with out the captain. The men put their knives in for thowle pins, and the passenger his German pipe for a like purpose and they pulled out to sea to get round a point of rocks over which the breakers were rolling heavily. When they had weathered this point they pulled for the land, on nearing which they called aloud for help; when they were heard by the son of Lieut. McLean, of the Coast Guard, who pointed out a place of safe landing. Immediately the alarm was spread that a vessel had struck on the Manacles. An attempt was then made to pull out some of the Coast Guard boats without success, from the dangerous character of the coast. The passengers who had got on shore were taken by the Coast Guard people in their attempt to put out to assist the vessel in order to direct them where she lay - those of the ships' crew who got on shore positively refusing to lend even this assistance. Unfortunately the boats could not reach the vessel, and were compelled to return to the shore. They postponed all further efforts till the following morning, when, going further up the coast to a more favourable place of embarkation, they reached the vessel, which was then not above 200 yards from the shore. During the whole of this time, the crew being, it is said, for the most part intoxicated, not a single effort was made to save the passengers by either the captain or crew. Some of the passengers attempted of themselves to get the cutter out, in doing so they stove her bottom, and lost the boat. The tide at the time the vessel struck was about two-third ebb, and when she sank she filled with water, but the decks were dry, and if assistance had been rendered at this time all might have been safely landed. Unfortunately, for the want of some directing mind, this opportunity was lost, and on the returning tide some portion of those on board got into the rigging, the crew getting in the tops, while a large number of the passengers took shelter in the long-boat - the boat was floated out of the chocks and beaten across the deck against the bulwarks until she was knocked to pieces, and the whole of her living freight either crushed or drowned. The rising tide soon did it's work, washing the unfortunate people off the decks and out of the lower rigging, most of them having from cold and suffering lost even the little energy necessary to make further ascent up the rigging. In the morning the survivors were taken off the wreck by the Coast Guard and landed at Coverack, St.Keverne, when they met the most hospitable reception from the inhabitants.

One of the passengers, Mr. E.C.Hele, of Shaldon, being provided with a life belt, swam ashore in the night, and he declares that had the boats been lowered when she struck all might have been saved. Another of the cabin passengers, Mr. Knuckey, lately returned from Australia, had lost £500 of his earnings, but succeeded in taking ashore 700 sovereigns in a belt. Elizabeth Pearce and Mary Ann Penman, two of the partied saved, left the service of Mrs. Hector, 2, Albany-place. Another passenger among the fortunate survivors, who left the dockyard to emigrate, as if foreseeing the chance of calamity, asked for a week's leave only, instead of his discharge from the service, this would have expired to-morrow; he now returns in time to retake his employment. Seventy-two of the bodied of the unfortunate people were buried in forty-four coffins on Sunday in St. Keverne churchyard - relations being buried together. Immediately the melancholy intelligence reached this place it was telegraphed to the Admiralty and to the Emigration Commissioners, upon which the former directed Sir William Parker, the Commander-in-Chief, to dispatch the Avon, second master Veitch in command, to the scene of the disaster, and which returned to this port on Tuesday-evening, bringing a number of the passengers saved. The Emigration Commissioners also directed Lieutenant Carew, R.N, agent at this port to proceed at once to the place of the wreck, and that gentleman left this port on Saturday evening. The Board of Trade also dispatched an officer to institute an inquiry into the circumstance of the wreck under the provision of the new act which came into operation on the inst., Commander Baldwin Wake, of the Coast Guard, having made the preliminary enquiry as the act directs.

In the interim, the coroner of the district has been performing the melancholy duty of holding inquisitions on the bodied thrown up by the sea. The evidence at the inquest showed that there was not a single palliating circumstance in favour of the captain. The vessel struck at ten p.m., and all were safe until daylight the next morning when the captain forbade the passengers from moving and in the case of a poor old man who fell overboard from the rigging, he refused to allow a party who volunteered to go to his assistance. The greatest loss of life was occasioned by so many of the passengers getting into the rigging that it broke away, the parties falling into the sea, those not able to swim or not strong enough to regain the vessel, perishing.

The jury having heard all the evidence, in recording their verdict, observed that they considered the conduct of the whole of the crew, with the exception of a seaman named Elder, most blameable, and expressed their surprise that the ship was not supplied with a signal gun nor blue lights, and recommended that a light should be placed on the Manacles. Against the Captain (Rawle) they returned a VERDICT OF MANSLAUGHTER, and the coroner's warrant was at once issued for his apprehension, and on which he has been lodged in the Cornwall county gaol at Bodmin.

The passengers who have survived have received their passage money back again, but in the instance where survivors have lost relatives, the passage money of the deceased has not been repaid.


on 10 May 1855.4 He's death notice appeared in PLYMOUTH AND STONEHOUSE JOURNAL

Thursday May 17th,1855



THE LOSS OF THE "JOHN"

FALMOUTH, May 9, 10 P.M.

Up to the present time about 80 corpses have been washed on shore in the immediate vicinity of the wreck. Owing to the change of wind the vessel has not entirely broken up, as was anticipated from the state of the weather on Saturday last. She appears to have parted just abaft the foremast, which still remains entire.

The Government steamer Avon, which had been dispatched from Plymouth for that purpose, left Coverack to return to that port with such passengers as wished to avail themselves of the opportunity. Captain Robertson, R.N., from the Board of Trade, has arrived to investigate the circumstances connected with this calamitous event, and the examination on oath of the crew and passengers commenced in the Town-hall here at two o'clock this afternoon before a numerous bench of county magistrates.

The evidence of William Goodwin, the chief mate, was to the effect that they left Plymouth, with moderate weather and wind from the north ward, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon of Thursday last. He turned in at a-quarter before nine o'clock, and shortly after passing the dead man at a distance of four or five miles, up to which time he did not observe any material alteration in either the wind or weather, the course steered being W.S.W, he was awoke from sleep by the ship striking violently on a rock. He immediately went on deck, he being then told that the ship had run against the Manacle Rocks. He supposed it was about ten o'clock. The weather was hazy, and he did not see the Falmouth light, found the master boatswain, and a number of passengers consisting of men, women, and children, on deck. The vessel soon forged herself off, and they endeavoured to run her towards the shore, but found the rudder was gone. After running for the land for about three-quarters of a mile they dropped an anchor, and the master gave orders for the boats to be lowered. The quarter-boat was first got out and some of the crew jumped into her. The deponent soon after lost sight of her. The life-boat was then attempted to be got out, but was stove and rendered useless. They then tried the long-boat, but the state of the tide prevented its being launched, and she remained hanging on the tackles. They has another boat, a pinnace, on board, but deponents did not know what became of her. In smooth water the boats would have accommodated about ninety-five persons. When the anchor was dropped the vessel was full of water. She grounded in about thirty feet with a flowing tide. The passengers got on the house on deck, the poop-deck, and in the rigging. Those on the poop were all washed away as the tide rose. During the night a great many were washed out of the shrouds and drowned. Deponent got from the house to the main rigging. After daylight boats came alongside from the shore and took off the surviving passengers. Deponent came on shore in the last boat at about six o'clock. The master left at the same time in another boat. One man was then in the mizzen and two in the main rigging. The crew consisted of nineteen in all. They are saved. Did not consider himself responsible for the vessel's course whilst the master was on deck, and is not aware that the master left. Received no orders from the captain, and gave none to the boatswain. After the vessel settled down in the water never left the deck. Those on board were in the water all the time they were hoisting out the boats. Has no certificate of competency, but one of service. They made sail after being towed outside the breakwater by a steam-tug, and deponent remained on deck till half-past eight or nine o'clock. At eight o'clock the boatswain relieved him. The vessel was the off the Dead man, and the wind a little abaft the beam. The first boat from ashore came to their assistance about half-past three o'clock, up to which time they were powerless. There was a great confusion of the boats alongside, but the captain gave his orders collectedly, and deponent did not see him get into one of the first boats. If the ship's boats had been safely got out a great may must have been saved. Had been mate before, though for the fist time with Capt. Rawle, whom he considered to be a sober man. Cannot account for the vessel's getting on shore. They had neither guns, muskets, blue lights nor rockets on board, and the only signal that could be made was a light in the rigging. If the boats from the shore had arrived earlier more would have been saved. He did not look at the compass during his watch. There was a light there between eight and nine o'clock. He saw none of the crew assisting passengers. They were all sober as far as he knew. There was no attempt to make a raft.

Edwin Elliot, boatswain, was next examined, and stated that he performed the duty of second mate at sea. He relieved the deck for the first watch at a quarter past eight o'clock. Did not look to see what course was being steered. The master had charge of the deck, and only left it for quarter of an hour to go below. There was a light in the binnacle, and James Curry, an able seaman, at the helm. Does not know anything about steering. Heard the chief mate come on deck and ask Curry what course she was steering. This was between eight and nine o'clock. The answer from the captain and man was, "W.S.W.". They trimmed sails three times by the masters orders, but he does not know for what purpose they hauled in the weather braces. Did not notice whether the ship carried a strong weather helm or not. Was in charge of the watch, but not of the ship. The master was in charge, and he thought it would have been improper for him to look at the compass under such circumstances. Noticed the Falmouth light at nine o'clock on the starboard beam, and the "look-out" man reported it to the captain, who answered, "All right". Did not see the Lizard lights, which he considered must have been shut in. At about half-past nine o'clock a sail was reported, and the captain ordered the yards to be squared; immediately after the look-out man reported "Fishing boats ahead," deponent ran forward, and saw they were rocks, and the next moment the vessel struck. The captain sang out to brace around the yards, and to run the vessel on shore to save the lives of the passengers, and they did their best to do so. The confusion was very great, and they could not get the boats off on account of the number and state of the passengers. There might have been at the time two feet of water on the upper deck. The master did everything in his power to assist the passengers up the rigging to save their lives. On further examination, deponent stated that the captain went below after the light was reported and the course altered, which was about an hour before the vessel struck, does not believe the master any more than himself, and any apprehension of danger till the vessel struck. The captain, helmsman, and the rest of the crew were sober, neither were they the worse for liquor on leaving the Sound. Deponent has had charge of watch seven years, and knows the compass, but nothing of navigation, though he can take a bearing, heard the captain order a good look-out to be kept for lights. Considers he behaved with coolness after the vessel struck, and that the boats were stove owing the confusion and motion that prevailed. Can give no account how the accident happened. Considers it lucky the boats were smashed in, otherwise all would probably have been drowned.

The enquiry was resumed on Saturday. Lieutenant Timothy Carew, R.N., the Government immigration officer at Falmouth stated that he inspected the vessel, and had signed the clearance certificate, believing that the provisions of the Passenger Act had been complied with. A seaman named Elder stated that when the vessel struck the captain was not unnerved, but acted as a seaman ought to act, and went about to tranquillise the passengers. Some other seaman gave evidence as to the steering of the vessel, but nothing of material importance was elicited respecting the fatal occurrence. The proceedings were adjourned.

On Saturday, Mr O.Dowd, assistant solicitor to the Board of Customs arrived at Plymouth and shortly after proceeded to Falmouth, to make enquiries on the part of the Board of Trade. The new Merchant Shipping Act of 1855, came into operation on the first of May, two days before the departure of the John. By this act the Board of Trade obtain very astringent powers over passenger ships. Section 501 limits the liability of the owners to £15 per ton, and, should the case be enforced in the present instance, the liability would amount to £6,960, the registered tonnage being 464 tons. Section 510 states that damages payable to each case of death or injury shall be assessed at £30. Impounded damaged are to be paid to Her Majesties Pay-master-General, and are distributed by the Board of Trade, who shall refund to the owner any surplus remaining under it's control.

on 17 May 1855.5
     Kent Database; Y. He was carpenter journeyman in 1851. He was the head of household in the census on on 30 March 1851 living at at Village, Swimbridge, Devonshire, EnglandG, occupation a carpenter journeyman.6 Samuel Featherstone emigrated from Plymouth, Devonshire, EnglandG on 3 May 1855 Bound for Quebec, Canada on Barque John. He was accident Sank with the loss of 190 lives on 5 May 1855 at Barque John, Manacles Rock, off St Keverne, Cornwall, EnglandG.7 He was accident family shipwrecked on 'The John' bound for Canada from Plymouth on 5 May 1855.8

Family

Mary Ball b. c 1808, d. 5 May 1855
Children
Last Edited13 Nov 2014
ReferenceP6853

Citations

  1. [S876] As per use web image, Church of Jesus Christ Latterday Saints, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America, name:     Samuel Featherstone
    gender:     Male
    baptism/christening date:     03 May 1807
    baptism/christening place:     BISHOPS TAWTON,DEVON,ENGLAND
    father's name:     Philip Featherstone
    mother's name:     Ann
    indexing project (batch) number:     C05034-1
    system origin:     England-ODM
    source film number:     916815.
  2. [S932] Webpage findmypast.co.uk (http://www.findmypast.co.uk) "Parish Record Collection - Marriage Record
    Groom's Surname:      Featherstone
    Groom's Forename:      Samuel
    Bride's Surname:      Ball
    Bride's Forename:      Mary
    Year:      1829
    Month:      Aug
    Day:      15
    Parish:      Swimbridge
    Town Or City:      
    County:      Devon
    Entry No.:      
    Notes:      
    Record source:      Devon Marriages - Transcripts
    Data provider:      Devon Family History Society."
  3. [S190] Unknown author, newspaper, Passengers of The 'John'

    The following is a compilation of

    (a) passenger details lodged at the Plymouth Custom house prior to sailing,

    (b) Plymouth And Stonehouse Journal reports of survivors (10th May 1855) and subsequent events,

    (c) other information from History Society members and

    (d) other information from the 1851 census.

    Ages are indicated where known; Where no age is known a '?' is shown. An age followed by a '?' indicates that the age cannot be determined with absolute certainty from the newspaper.

    Those known to have survived are followed by (s) and those known to have drowned by (d). Others are presumed to have drowned. Those who gave evidence at the trial of Captain Rawle are followed by (w).

    Family relationships are only included if they have been evidenced.

    Featherstone Sam’l 47 Journeyman Carpenter Swimbridge, N Devon.

    Featherstone Mary 47 wife

    Featherstone Mary A 24 daughter, Servant

    Featherstone Betsy 23 Servant

    Featherstone Jane 19 Servant

    Featherstone Harriet 17 daughter, Servant

    Featherstone John 13 son

    Featherstone George 11 son

    Featherstone Lucy 8 daughter

    Featherstone Sarah 4.
  4. [S190] Unknown author, newspaper, PLYMOUTH AND STONEHOUSE JOURNAL

    Thursday May 10th,1855

    FRIGHTFUL SHIPWRECK:

    AWFUL LOSS OF HUMAN LIFE

    On Saturday morning last, the inhabitants of the three towns were astounded and shocked by the intelligence that the barque John, of this port, Rawle, master, which had only left Plymouth Sound on Thursday afternoon, had struck on the Manacles Rock, off St. Keverne, on the coast of Cornwall, and that upwards of one hundred and ninety of her passengers had been drowned. The intelligence at first appeared to be too frightful to be credited; but it was soon ascertained that the statement was only too true, and that one of the most deplorable shipwrecks that had ever taken place on the western close had occurred.

    The John was bound for Quebec, and when she left the Sound about four o'clock on Thursday afternoon, who had on board 154 adult passengers, 98 children, and 16 infants, together in a crew in all of 19, making the total of souls on board 287. The passengers principally from the North of Devon, the great source of American emigration in the West of England, numbers from other parts of this country and the remainder from the counties of Cornwall, Dorset and Somerset, - in fact, she was considered what is termed a West Country ship. Many of the friends accompanied the unfortunate passengers to this port to bid them farewell, and as the vessel left the Sound relatives might be seen here and there on the Hoe, gazing after her with painful interest, or shedding tears at the separation between them and those they loved dearly - a separation which, as the sequel proved, was, in many instances a fatal one. Others put on a bolder front, and sought to infuse some of their own spirits into their friends on board by hearty cheers in which they were joined by some of the spectators, who happened to be present. The ship left at the top of the ebb tide with a favourable wind off the land, and all bid her fare for a prosperous voyage down channel. How their hopes were blighted, it would be impossible to say, so varied are the accounts of those who have been spared to tell the catastrophe. This much, however, we may state that all accounts agree in condemning the captain, who, it is said, had no business to be so close in shore, and who, notwithstanding that he was warned of the danger, stupidly persisted in keeping the vessel in the same course. So embittered were the survivors towards him that it is stated the Coast Guard were obliged to protect him from their fury. But whether this anger arose from a belief that the accident was the result of inattention on his part - or that the captain and crew saved themselves, as stated, to the sacrifice of the passengers - or, in fact, what gave rise to this angry feeling at all, it would be wrong to say until evidence shall be taken as it is easy to imagine that the survivors, many of whom have sustained the loss of their dearest relatives, whilst nearly all have lost the whole of their wealth the possessed, would be embittered, and give vent to their feelings against one to whom they had entrusted their life and property.

    The scene after the vessel struck, as may be anticipated, was most distressing, the utmost confusion prevailed, and most of those on board gave themselves up in despair. The account rendered by one of the passengers is most heart-rending, thought the character of all similar disasters, except that human sympathy was in this case the more excited from the number of children on board, and from the extraordinary efforts of their parents to save them from the death impending. One of the passengers, William Walters, a man apparently of sickly and delicate constitution, succeeded as the vessel settled in the water, in taking his wife and six children into the rigging one by one - the youngest, unfortunately, fell from the mother's arms into the sea; the father, though unable to swim, plunged after it, but failed in his noble effort to save his child, and, with difficulty, regained the ship. Another, Wm. Clemence, who had a wife and eight children on board, attempted to raise the six youngest of them into the rigging by the aid of a "sheet", with which he had tied them together. Unfortunately, he failed in his efforts, and four were drowned. Samuel Rogers, a boy aged fifteen, one of the other passengers saved, has lost his father, mother, two brothers, a sister, and a cousin. Henry North, saved, lost his wife and three children.

    So far as the facts can be gleaned from the parties on board, it appears that all went prosperously till about half past nine, when they made the Falmouth light, the captain himself pointing it out to one of the passengers on deck. Just at this time the second mate was trying to sight the Lizard light, and he asked some of the passengers if they could not see the reflection of the light in the sky; they replied they could not, when the captain said he could not either, but they would see it fast enough when they got there. It was the second-mate's watch, and the captain shortly after went below. About ten o'clock the mate came on the poop and asked the passengers if they had seen the captain, and on being asked what he wanted the captain for, he said he (the mate) thought they were a deal too nigh the land. Shortly after this the captain came on deck, and what the mate had stated, "that they were getting too close on land," was reported to him; the captain "pooh-poohed" the report. Soon afterward someone forward sung out "rocks," and almost immediately the vessel struck with violence, so much so that she bumped over the rock and then struck, with still greater force upon rocks further in; the captain was then distinctly heard to call out "run her aground". The vessel then had all sail on her with great way, as she was when the accident happened going eight or nine knots, and though ran aground, the sea washed off her again, and she ran down the coast for some distance. An attempt was then made to bring her up by letting go an anchor, when she grounded heavily broadside on. Attention was then directed to the boats - of which she had four on board, three on deck and one over the side - the captain, four seamen, a boy and one passenger, jumped into the latter boat and called out to lower, but finding no one answered the call, the captain returned to the deck of the vessel, when the boat was lowered. On touching the water it was found there was no plug in her, and she was without thowle pins. While they were waiting to supply these deficiencies, her tackle became unhooked, and the boat drifted off from the vessel with out the captain. The men put their knives in for thowle pins, and the passenger his German pipe for a like purpose and they pulled out to sea to get round a point of rocks over which the breakers were rolling heavily. When they had weathered this point they pulled for the land, on nearing which they called aloud for help; when they were heard by the son of Lieut. McLean, of the Coast Guard, who pointed out a place of safe landing. Immediately the alarm was spread that a vessel had struck on the Manacles. An attempt was then made to pull out some of the Coast Guard boats without success, from the dangerous character of the coast. The passengers who had got on shore were taken by the Coast Guard people in their attempt to put out to assist the vessel in order to direct them where she lay - those of the ships' crew who got on shore positively refusing to lend even this assistance. Unfortunately the boats could not reach the vessel, and were compelled to return to the shore. They postponed all further efforts till the following morning, when, going further up the coast to a more favourable place of embarkation, they reached the vessel, which was then not above 200 yards from the shore. During the whole of this time, the crew being, it is said, for the most part intoxicated, not a single effort was made to save the passengers by either the captain or crew. Some of the passengers attempted of themselves to get the cutter out, in doing so they stove her bottom, and lost the boat. The tide at the time the vessel struck was about two-third ebb, and when she sank she filled with water, but the decks were dry, and if assistance had been rendered at this time all might have been safely landed. Unfortunately, for the want of some directing mind, this opportunity was lost, and on the returning tide some portion of those on board got into the rigging, the crew getting in the tops, while a large number of the passengers took shelter in the long-boat - the boat was floated out of the chocks and beaten across the deck against the bulwarks until she was knocked to pieces, and the whole of her living freight either crushed or drowned. The rising tide soon did it's work, washing the unfortunate people off the decks and out of the lower rigging, most of them having from cold and suffering lost even the little energy necessary to make further ascent up the rigging. In the morning the survivors were taken off the wreck by the Coast Guard and landed at Coverack, St.Keverne, when they met the most hospitable reception from the inhabitants.

    One of the passengers, Mr. E.C.Hele, of Shaldon, being provided with a life belt, swam ashore in the night, and he declares that had the boats been lowered when she struck all might have been saved. Another of the cabin passengers, Mr. Knuckey, lately returned from Australia, had lost £500 of his earnings, but succeeded in taking ashore 700 sovereigns in a belt. Elizabeth Pearce and Mary Ann Penman, two of the partied saved, left the service of Mrs. Hector, 2, Albany-place. Another passenger among the fortunate survivors, who left the dockyard to emigrate, as if foreseeing the chance of calamity, asked for a week's leave only, instead of his discharge from the service, this would have expired to-morrow; he now returns in time to retake his employment. Seventy-two of the bodied of the unfortunate people were buried in forty-four coffins on Sunday in St. Keverne churchyard - relations being buried together. Immediately the melancholy intelligence reached this place it was telegraphed to the Admiralty and to the Emigration Commissioners, upon which the former directed Sir William Parker, the Commander-in-Chief, to dispatch the Avon, second master Veitch in command, to the scene of the disaster, and which returned to this port on Tuesday-evening, bringing a number of the passengers saved. The Emigration Commissioners also directed Lieutenant Carew, R.N, agent at this port to proceed at once to the place of the wreck, and that gentleman left this port on Saturday evening. The Board of Trade also dispatched an officer to institute an inquiry into the circumstance of the wreck under the provision of the new act which came into operation on the inst., Commander Baldwin Wake, of the Coast Guard, having made the preliminary enquiry as the act directs.

    In the interim, the coroner of the district has been performing the melancholy duty of holding inquisitions on the bodied thrown up by the sea. The evidence at the inquest showed that there was not a single palliating circumstance in favour of the captain. The vessel struck at ten p.m., and all were safe until daylight the next morning when the captain forbade the passengers from moving and in the case of a poor old man who fell overboard from the rigging, he refused to allow a party who volunteered to go to his assistance. The greatest loss of life was occasioned by so many of the passengers getting into the rigging that it broke away, the parties falling into the sea, those not able to swim or not strong enough to regain the vessel, perishing.

    The jury having heard all the evidence, in recording their verdict, observed that they considered the conduct of the whole of the crew, with the exception of a seaman named Elder, most blameable, and expressed their surprise that the ship was not supplied with a signal gun nor blue lights, and recommended that a light should be placed on the Manacles. Against the Captain (Rawle) they returned a VERDICT OF MANSLAUGHTER, and the coroner's warrant was at once issued for his apprehension, and on which he has been lodged in the Cornwall county gaol at Bodmin.

    The passengers who have survived have received their passage money back again, but in the instance where survivors have lost relatives, the passage money of the deceased has not been repaid.


  5. [S190] Unknown author, newspaper, PLYMOUTH AND STONEHOUSE JOURNAL

    Thursday May 17th,1855



    THE LOSS OF THE "JOHN"

    FALMOUTH, May 9, 10 P.M.

    Up to the present time about 80 corpses have been washed on shore in the immediate vicinity of the wreck. Owing to the change of wind the vessel has not entirely broken up, as was anticipated from the state of the weather on Saturday last. She appears to have parted just abaft the foremast, which still remains entire.

    The Government steamer Avon, which had been dispatched from Plymouth for that purpose, left Coverack to return to that port with such passengers as wished to avail themselves of the opportunity. Captain Robertson, R.N., from the Board of Trade, has arrived to investigate the circumstances connected with this calamitous event, and the examination on oath of the crew and passengers commenced in the Town-hall here at two o'clock this afternoon before a numerous bench of county magistrates.

    The evidence of William Goodwin, the chief mate, was to the effect that they left Plymouth, with moderate weather and wind from the north ward, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon of Thursday last. He turned in at a-quarter before nine o'clock, and shortly after passing the dead man at a distance of four or five miles, up to which time he did not observe any material alteration in either the wind or weather, the course steered being W.S.W,, he was awoke from sleep by the ship striking violently on a rock. He immediately went on deck, he being then told that the ship had run against the Manacle Rocks. He supposed it was about ten o'clock. The weather was hazy, and he did not see the Falmouth light, found the master boatswain, and a number of passengers consisting of men, women, and children, on deck. The vessel soon forged herself off, and they endeavoured to run her towards the shore, but found the rudder was gone. After running for the land for about three-quarters of a mile they dropped an anchor, and the master gave orders for the boats to be lowered. The quarter-boat was first got out and some of the crew jumped into her. The deponent soon after lost sight of her. The life-boat was then attempted to be got out, but was stove and rendered useless. They then tried the long-boat, but the state of the tide prevented its being launched, and she remained hanging on the tackles. They has another boat, a pinnace, on board, but deponents did not know what became of her. In smooth water the boats would have accommodated about ninety-five persons. When the anchor was dropped the vessel was full of water. She grounded in about thirty feet with a flowing tide. The passengers got on the house on deck, the poop-deck, and in the rigging. Those on the poop were all washed away as the tide rose. During the night a great many were washed out of the shrouds and drowned. Deponent got from the house to the main rigging. After daylight boats came alongside from the shore and took off the surviving passengers. Deponent came on shore in the last boat at about six o'clock. The master left at the same time in another boat. One man was then in the mizzen and two in the main rigging. The crew consisted of nineteen in all. They are saved. Did not consider himself responsible for the vessel's course whilst the master was on deck, and is not aware that the master left. Received no orders from the captain, and gave none to the boatswain. After the vessel settled down in the water never left the deck. Those on board were in the water all the time they were hoisting out the boats. Has no certificate of competency, but one of service. They made sail after being towed outside the breakwater by a steam-tug, and deponent remained on deck till half-past eight or nine o'clock. At eight o'clock the boatswain relieved him. The vessel was the off the Dead man, and the wind a little abaft the beam. The first boat from ashore came to their assistance about half-past three o'clock, up to which time they were powerless. There was a great confusion of the boats alongside, but the captain gave his orders collectedly, and deponent did not see him get into one of the first boats. If the ship's boats had been safely got out a great may must have been saved. Had been mate before, though for the fist time with Capt. Rawle, whom he considered to be a sober man. Cannot account for the vessel's getting on shore. They had neither guns, muskets, blue lights nor rockets on board, and the only signal that could be made was a light in the rigging. If the boats from the shore had arrived earlier more would have been saved. He did not look at the compass during his watch. There was a light there between eight and nine o'clock. He saw none of the crew assisting passengers. They were all sober as far as he knew. There was no attempt to make a raft.

    Edwin Elliot, boatswain, was next examined, and stated that he performed the duty of second mate at sea. He relieved the deck for the first watch at a quarter past eight o'clock. Did not look to see what course was being steered. The master had charge of the deck, and only left it for quarter of an hour to go below. There was a light in the binnacle, and James Curry, an able seaman, at the helm. Does not know anything about steering. Heard the chief mate come on deck and ask Curry what course she was steering. This was between eight and nine o'clock. The answer from the captain and man was, "W.S.W.". They trimmed sails three times by the masters orders, but he does not know for what purpose they hauled in the weather braces. Did not notice whether the ship carried a strong weather helm or not. Was in charge of the watch, but not of the ship. The master was in charge, and he thought it would have been improper for him to look at the compass under such circumstances. Noticed the Falmouth light at nine o'clock on the starboard beam, and the "look-out" man reported it to the captain, who answered, "All right". Did not see the Lizard lights, which he considered must have been shut in. At about half-past nine o'clock a sail was reported, and the captain ordered the yards to be squared; immediately after the look-out man reported "Fishing boats ahead," deponent ran forward, and saw they were rocks, and the next moment the vessel struck. The captain sang out to brace around the yards, and to run the vessel on shore to save the lives of the passengers, and they did their best to do so. The confusion was very great, and they could not get the boats off on account of the number and state of the passengers. There might have been at the time two feet of water on the upper deck. The master did everything in his power to assist the passengers up the rigging to save their lives. On further examination, deponent stated that the captain went below after the light was reported and the course altered, which was about an hour before the vessel struck, does not believe the master any more than himself, and any apprehension of danger till the vessel struck. The captain, helmsman, and the rest of the crew were sober, neither were they the worse for liquor on leaving the Sound. Deponent has had charge of watch seven years, and knows the compass, but nothing of navigation, though he can take a bearing, heard the captain order a good look-out to be kept for lights. Considers he behaved with coolness after the vessel struck, and that the boats were stove owing the confusion and motion that prevailed. Can give no account how the accident happened. Considers it lucky the boats were smashed in, otherwise all would probably have been drowned.

    The enquiry was resumed on Saturday. Lieutenant Timothy Carew, R.N., the Government immigration officer at Falmouth stated that he inspected the vessel, and had signed the clearance certificate, believing that the provisions of the Passenger Act had been complied with. A seaman named Elder stated that when the vessel struck the captain was not unnerved, but acted as a seaman ought to act, and went about to tranquillise the passengers. Some other seaman gave evidence as to the steering of the vessel, but nothing of material importance was elicited respecting the fatal occurrence. The proceedings were adjourned.

    On Saturday, Mr O.Dowd, assistant solicitor to the Board of Customs arrived at Plymouth and shortly after proceeded to Falmouth, to make enquiries on the part of the Board of Trade. The new Merchant Shipping Act of 1855, came into operation on the first of May, two days before the departure of the John. By this act the Board of Trade obtain very astringent powers over passenger ships. Section 501 limits the liability of the owners to £15 per ton, and, should the case be enforced in the present instance, the liability would amount to £6,960, the registered tonnage being 464 tons. Section 510 states that damages payable to each case of death or injury shall be assessed at £30. Impounded damaged are to be paid to Her Majesties Pay-master-General, and are distributed by the Board of Trade, who shall refund to the owner any surplus remaining under it's control.

  6. [S1851] National for England & Wales, "1851 census HO107/1892/37/7
    Village, Swimbridge, Devon
    Samuel Featherstone head M 43 carpenter journeyman B Tawton Devonshire
    Mary Featherstone wife M 43 Swimbridge Devonshire
    Mary Featherstone daughter U 21 dressmaker Swimbridge Devonshire
    Harriet Featherstone daughter 12 scholar Swimbridge Devonshire
    John Featherstone son 9 scholar Swimbridge Devonshire
    George Featherstone son 7 scholar Swimbridge Devonshire
    Lucy Featherstone daughter 3 Swimbridge Devonshire."
  7. [S190] Unknown author, newspaper, The following is a compilation of
    (a) passenger details lodged at the Plymouth Custom house prior to sailing,
    (b) Plymouth And Stonehouse Journal reports of survivors (10th May 1855) and subsequent events,
    (c) other information from History Society members and
    (d) other information from the 1851 census.
    Ages are indicated where known; Where no age is known a '?' is shown. An age followed by a '?' indicates that the age cannot be determined with absolute certainty from the newspaper.
    Those known to have survived are followed by (s) and those known to have drowned by (d). Others are presumed to have drowned. Those who gave evidence at the trial of Captain Rawle are followed by (w).
    Family relationships are only included if they have been evidenced.
    Featherstone Sam’l 47 Journeyman Carpenter Swimbridge, N Devon.
    Featherstone Mary 47 wife
    Featherstone Mary A 24 daughter, Servant
    Featherstone Betsy 23 Servant
    Featherstone Jane 19 Servant
    Featherstone Harriet 17 daughter, Servant
    Featherstone John 13 son
    Featherstone George 11 son
    Featherstone Lucy 8 daughter
    Featherstone Sarah 4.
  8. [S190] Unknown author, newspaper, Passengers of The 'John'

    The following is a compilation of

    (a) passenger details lodged at the Plymouth Custom house prior to sailing,

    (b) Plymouth And Stonehouse Journal reports of survivors (10th May 1855) and subsequent events,

    (c) other information from History Society members and

    (d) other information from the 1851 census.

    Ages are indicated where known; Where no age is known a '?' is shown. An age followed by a '?' indicates that the age cannot be determined with absolute certainty from the newspaper.

    Those known to have survived are followed by (s) and those known to have drowned by (d). Others are presumed to have drowned. Those who gave evidence at the trial of Captain Rawle are followed by (w).

    Family relationships are only included if they have been evidenced.

    Featherstone Sam’l 47 Journeyman Carpenter Swimbridge, N Devon.

    Featherstone Mary 47 wife

    Featherstone Mary A 24 daughter, Servant

    Featherstone Betsy 23 Servant

    Featherstone Jane 19 Servant

    Featherstone Harriet 17 daughter, Servant

    Featherstone John 13 son

    Featherstone George 11 son

    Featherstone Lucy 8 daughter

    Featherstone Sarah 4.
  9. [S931] Webpage findmypast.co.uk (http://www.findmypast.co.uk) "Parish Record Collection - Baptism Record
    Surname:      Featherstone
    Forenames:      Mary Anne
    Father's Forename:      Samuel
    Mother's Forename:      Mary
    Father's Occupation:      Carpenter
    Year:      1830
    Month:      Mar
    Day:      7
    Abode:      Swimbridge
    Parish:      Swimbridge
    Town Or City:      
    County:      Devon
    Record source:      Devon Baptisms - Transcripts
    Data provider:      Devon Family History Society."
  10. [S931] Webpage findmypast.co.uk (http://www.findmypast.co.uk) "Parish Record Collection - Baptism Record
    Surname:      Featherstone
    Forenames:      Betsy
    Father's Forename:      Samuel
    Mother's Forename:      Mary
    Father's Occupation:      Carpenter
    Year:      1833
    Month:      Feb
    Day:      24
    Abode:      Swimbridge
    Parish:      Swimbridge
    Town Or City:      
    County:      Devon
    Record source:      Devon Baptisms - Transcripts
    Data provider:      Devon Family History Society."
  11. [S931] Webpage findmypast.co.uk (http://www.findmypast.co.uk) "Parish Record Collection - Baptism Record
    Surname:      Featherstone
    Forenames:      Jane
    Father's Forename:      Samuel
    Mother's Forename:      Mary
    Father's Occupation:      Carpenter
    Year:      1835
    Month:      Nov
    Day:      22
    Abode:      Swimbridge
    Parish:      Swimbridge
    Town Or City:      
    County:      Devon
    Record source:      Devon Baptisms - Transcripts
    Data provider:      Devon Family History Society."
  12. [S931] Webpage findmypast.co.uk (http://www.findmypast.co.uk) "Parish Record Collection - Baptism Record
    Surname:      Featherstone
    Forenames:      Harriet
    Father's Forename:      Samuel
    Mother's Forename:      Mary
    Father's Occupation:      Carpenter
    Year:      1838
    Month:      Jul
    Day:      22
    Abode:      Swimbridge
    Parish:      Swimbridge
    Town Or City:      
    County:      Devon
    Record source:      Devon Baptisms - Transcripts
    Data provider:      Devon Family History Society."
  13. [S876] As per use web image, Church of Jesus Christ Latterday Saints, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America, name:     John Featherstone
    gender:     Male
    baptism/christening date:     26 Jul 1841
    baptism/christening place:     SWIMBRIDGE,DEVON,ENGLAND
    father's name:     Samuel Featherstone
    mother's name:     Mary
    indexing project (batch) number:     C05250-1
    system origin:     England-ODM
    source film number:     917536.
  14. [S876] As per use web image, Church of Jesus Christ Latterday Saints, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America, name:     George Featherstone
    gender:     Male
    baptism/christening date:     17 Sep 1843
    baptism/christening place:     SWIMBRIDGE,DEVON,ENGLAND
    father's name:     Samuel Featherstone
    mother's name:     Mary
    indexing project (batch) number:     C05250-1
    system origin:     England-ODM
    source film number:     917536.
  15. [S876] As per use web image, Church of Jesus Christ Latterday Saints, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America, name:     Lucy Featherstone
    gender:     Female
    baptism/christening date:     18 Jul 1847
    baptism/christening place:     SWIMBRIDGE,DEVON,ENGLAND
    father's name:     Samuel Featherstone
    mother's name:     Mary
    indexing project (batch) number:     C05250-1
    system origin:     England-ODM
    source film number:     917536.
  16. [S190] Unknown author, newspaper, The following is a compilation of
    (a) passenger details lodged at the Plymouth Custom house prior to sailing,
    (b) Plymouth And Stonehouse Journal reports of survivors (10th May 1855) and subsequent events,
    (c) other information from History Society members and
    (d) other information from the 1851 census.
    Ages are indicated where known; Where no age is known a '?' is shown. An age followed by a '?' indicates that the age cannot be determined with absolute certainty from the newspaper.
    Those known to have survived are followed by (s) and those known to have drowned by (d). Others are presumed to have drowned. Those who gave evidence at the trial of Captain Rawle are followed by (w).
    Family relationships are only included if they have been evidenced.
    Featherstone Sam’l 47 Journeyman Carpenter Swimbridge, N Devon.
    Featherstone Mary 47 wife
    Featherstone Mary A 24 daughter, Servant
    Featherstone Betsy 23 Servant
    Featherstone Jane 19 Servant
    Featherstone Harriet 17 daughter, Servant
    Featherstone John 13 son
    Featherstone George 11 son
    Featherstone Lucy 8 daughter
    Featherstone Sarah 4.

James Fairbanks1

M, #36119
Last Edited2 Aug 2015

Citations

  1. [S2] As per use, Index of Marriage as per use, Taken from the indexes on Free BMD and Find My Past
    First name(s)      VIOLET A K
    Last name      FEATHERSTONE
    Marriage quarter      1
    Marriage year      1922
    Registration month      -
    MarriageFinder™      VIOLET A K FEATHERSTONE married
    JAMES FAIRBANKS
    Spouse's last name      FAIRBANKS
    District      PORTSMOUTH
    District number      -
    County      Hampshire
    Country      England
    Volume      2B
    Page      727 (1837-1965).

Samuel Featherstone

M, #36120, b. circa 1791, d. 30 June 1871
Father*(Unknown) (Unknown)
     Samuel Featherstone was born circa 1791 at Plymouth, Devonshire, EnglandG. He was the son of (Unknown) (Unknown). Samuel Featherstone died on 30 June 1871 at 14 Coburg Street, Plymouth, Devonshire, EnglandG, aged aged 80.1,2 He His death was registered in the Plymouth registration district in the quarter of September 1871 Vol./Page 5b.169.3
     Kent Database; Y. He began military service on 2 February 1815 Royal Navy.4 He was Freedom of in 1817 at City of Plymouth, Devonshire, EnglandG.5 He was lieut Royal Navt half pay in 1851. He was the head of household in the census on on 30 March 1851 living at at 14 Coburg Street, Plymouth, Devonshire, EnglandG, occupation a lieut Royal Navt half pay.6 He was Commander RN retired in 1861. He was the head of household in the census on 7 April 1861 occupation Commander RN retired living at 14 Coburg Street, Plymouth, Devonshire, EnglandG.7 He lived in 1871 at 19 Coburg Street, Plymouth, Devonshire, EnglandG. He was Commander on the Retired List of Her Majesty’s Navy in 1871. He was the head of household in the Census on 2 April 1871 Samuel Featherstone Occupation was a retired commander RN living at 14 Coburg Street, Plymouth, Devonshire, EnglandG.8 He left a will before 30 June 1871 at 14 Coburg Street, Plymouth, Devonshire, EnglandG.9 Samuel Featherstone was 80 years at death as of September 1871.3
Last Edited20 Mar 2013
ReferenceP7135

Citations

  1. [S3] As per use, death registration index, (Sep 1871 Plymouth DEV 5b 169 age 80).
  2. [S142] As per issue, Gentleman's Magazine, Gentemen's Magazine volume 157 Obituary 1871
    Devon - Jan 12 - at Plymouth, Commander Samuel Featherstone (1790) R.N. one of the oldest Freemen and for many years one of the Common Council of that Borough.
  3. [S3] As per use, death registration index, Collected May 2000
    death registration index Samel Featherstone Sep 1871 Plymouth DEV 5b169 age 80.
  4. [S1260] Military Service Record Navy, Samuel Featherstone is in the navy lists if 1847 with a seniority date of 2 Feb 1815- presumably either when he was commissioned or when he joined as a midshipman his rank LT.
  5. [S190] Unknown author, newspaper, FREEMEN OF THE BOROUGH OF PLYMOUTH, 1817
    Samuel Featherstone Captain, Royal Navy
    Horrabridge, near Tavistock.
  6. [S1851] National for England & Wales, "1851 census HO107/1879/352/22
    14 Coburg Street, Plymouth, Devon
    Samuel Featherstone head U 60 lieut Royal Navt half pay Plymouth,Devon
    Mary Chapman serv M 44 house servant Helston, Cornwall."
  7. [S1861] National for England & Wales, "1861 census RG9/1442/52/23
    14 Coburg Street, Plymouth, Devon
    Samuel Featherstone head U 70 Commander RN retired Plymouth, Devon
    Mary I Chapman serv M 59 general servant Helston, Cornwall
    Robert Chapman visitor M 75 labourer at cement works Frogmore, Devon."
  8. [S1871] 2009 Census filmed, unknown repository address, as per citation, 1871 census RG10/2122/53/47
    19 Coburg Street, Plymouth, Devon
    Samuel Featherstone head U 80 retired commander RN Plymouth, Devon
    Catherine Ferris housekeeper W 55 housekeeper Liskeard, Cornwall.
  9. [S14] Unknown author, Will, probate OF UNCLE
    The will with a codicil of Samuel Featherstone late of 14 Coburg street Plymouth in the county of Devon Commander on the Retired Lis tof Her Majesty’s Navy who died 30 June 1871 at 14 Coburg Street was proved at Exeter by Samuel Featherstone of Marlborough in the county of Wiltshire Assistant master of the Grammer School Marlborough the nephew and Henry Luscombe of Plymouth merchant the executors effects £4000.

Samuel Featherstone

M, #36121
Father*(Unknown) (Unknown)
     Samuel Featherstone is the son of (Unknown) (Unknown).
     Kent Database; Y.

Family

Mary Munn d. 1842
Last Edited20 Mar 2013
ReferenceP6966

William Henry Green1

M, #36122

Family

Child
Last Edited2 Aug 2015

Citations

  1. [S266] Parish register Microfilm Transcript, As per citation, 1837-1911 "In the register of Cuthbert Bainbridge Memorial Wesleyan Methodist Chapel Heaton
    1900 marriage solemnised at Cuthbert Bainbridge Memorial Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in the County of Newcastle upon Tyne
    March 5, 1900,
    James Simpson Featherstone aged 49 a widower, Corporation Street superintendent, 43 Heaton Hall Road, Newcastle, father Henry Dale Featherstone a warehouseman.
    To
    Florence Emily Coates aged 35 a widow of 51 Heaton Road Newcastle, father William Henry Green deceased, an engineer.
    Both signed in the presence of Rolf Worthington and J. George Featherstone.
    By certification."

(Unknown) Coates1

M, #36123

Family

Florence Emily Green b. c 1865, d. Sep 1934
Last Edited2 Aug 2015

Citations

  1. [S266] Parish register Microfilm Transcript, As per citation, 1837-1911 "In the register of Cuthbert Bainbridge Memorial Wesleyan Methodist Chapel Heaton
    1900 marriage solemnised at Cuthbert Bainbridge Memorial Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in the County of Newcastle upon Tyne
    March 5, 1900,
    James Simpson Featherstone aged 49 a widower, Corporation Street superintendent, 43 Heaton Hall Road, Newcastle, father Henry Dale Featherstone a warehouseman.
    To
    Florence Emily Coates aged 35 a widow of 51 Heaton Road Newcastle, father William Henry Green deceased, an engineer.
    Both signed in the presence of Rolf Worthington and J. George Featherstone.
    By certification."

Arthur Percy Dalton1

M, #36124, b. circa 1882, d. 12 January 1962
     Arthur Percy Dalton was born circa 1882 at Newcastle on Tyne, Northumberland, EnglandG.2,1 He married Lucy Featherstone, daughter of Robert Featherstone and Isabella Hannah Thwaites, on 15 August 1910 at Cuthbert Bainbridge Memorial Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Heaton, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Northumberland, EnglandG.1 Lucy Featherstone and Arthur Percy Dalton marriage was registered in Newcastle upon Tyne district Vol/Page 10b.299 in the quarter of September 1910.3 He died on 12 January 1962 at The Willows Windsor Road, North Shields, Northumberland, EnglandG.4,5

Family

Lucy Featherstone b. Jun 1883, d. 14 Dec 1949
Last Edited16 Jun 2017

Citations

  1. [S266] Parish register Microfilm Transcript, As per citation, 1837-1911 "copy of an entry of marriage in the register of Cuthbert Bainbridge Memorial Wesleyan Methodist Chapel Heaton.
    1910 marriage solemnised at Cuthbert Bainbridge Memorial Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in the county of Newcastle upon Tyne.
    Entry number 30 on 15 August 1910
    Arthur Percy Dalton aged 28 a bachelor a hard warehouseman of 12 Wesley Terrace Newcastle upon Tyne, father William Herbert Dalton a clerk.
    To
    Lucy Featherstone aged 27 a spinster of 33 Meldon Terrace Newcastle upon Tyne father Robert Featherstone, Foreman joiner
    both signed in the presence of Robert a Dalton and, Lily Featherstone by certification."
  2. [S1] As per person, Index of Births various (see entry), England & Wales births 1837-2006 Transcription
    First name(s)     ARTHUR PERCY
    Last name     DALTON
    Birth year     1882
    Birth quarter     1
    Registration month     -
    Mother's last name     -
    District     NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE
    County     Northumberland
    Country     England
    Volume     10B
    Page     32 (1837-2010).
  3. [S2] As per use, Index of Marriage as per use, Taken from online images on 1837online.com Oct 2005 (1837-1965).
  4. [S194] Unknown author, Probate,
    Probate:
    Name: Arthur Percy Dalton
    Probate Date: 18 Jun 1963
    Death Date: 12 Jan 1962
    Death Place: North Shields
    Registry: Newcastle Upon Tyne

    Dalton Arthur Percy of The Willows Windsor Road North Shields died 12 January 1962 Administration (Limited) Newcastle upon Tyne 18 June to Frederick George Egner O.B.E. town clerk. Effects £152.8s.6d.
  5. [S3] As per use, death registration index, Only death I can find: Age is not correct ???
    Name: Arthur P Dalton
    Birth Date: abt 1872
    Date of Registration: Mar 1962
    Age at Death: 90
    Registration district: Tynemouth
    Inferred County: Northumberland
    Volume: 1b
    Page: 572.

Joseph William Waugh1

M, #36125, b. circa 1877
Father*Edward Waugh1 b. c 1851
Mother*Jane Featherstone1 b. 26 Nov 1856
     Joseph William Waugh was born circa 1877 at Rochdale, Lancashire, EnglandG.1 He was the son of Edward Waugh and Jane Featherstone.1
     Joseph William Waugh was enumerated as the son of Edward Waugh in the Census on 3 April 1881 Edward Waugh Occupation was a Cardroom Jobber (Cotton) living at 1, Yard Off Ashworth Street, Rochdale, Lancashire, EnglandG.1
Last Edited24 Aug 2015

Citations

  1. [S1881] National for England & Wales, "1881 England, Wales & Scotland Census Transcription
    1, Yard Off Ashworth Street, Spotland, Rochdale, Lancashire, England
    Edwin Waugh Head Married Male 29 1852 Cardroom Jobber (Cotton) Rochdale, Lancashire, England      
    Jane Waugh Wife Married Female 24 1857 Winder (Cotton) Bilsdale Yorkshire, England      
    Joseph William Waugh Son Single Male 4 1877 - Rochdale, Lancashire, England
    Parish      Spotland
    County      Lancashire
    Country      England
    Registration district      Rochdale
    Archive reference      RG11
    Piece number      4111
    Folio      10
    Page      14."

Jenetta Harrison Hargrave Carroll1

F, #36126, b. 28 May 1864, d. 18 January 1930
     Jenetta Harrison Hargrave Carroll was born on 28 May 1864 at Cork, Co Cork, IrelandG.2,3 Samuel William Featherstone and Jenetta Harrison Hargrave Carroll marriage was registered in Cork district Vol/Page an unknown place in the quarter of between July 1884 and September 1884.4 She married Samuel William Featherstone, son of Samuel Featherstone and Emma Julia Thuell, on 11 September 1884 at Holy Trinity, Cork, IrelandG.2,5 Jenetta Harrison Hargrave Carroll died on 18 January 1930 at Endiaug, Pinhoe, Devonshire, EnglandG.6 Her estate was probated on 11 April 1930 at London, London, EnglandG.6
     Kent Database; Y. As of 1884,her married name was Featherstone. She wasenumerated as the Wife of Samuel William Featherstone in the Census on 5 April 1891 Samuel William Featherstone Occupation was a vicar of Whitchurch living at The Vicarage, Whitchurch, Devonshire, EnglandG.2 Jenetta Harrison Hargrave Featherstone wasenumerated as the Wife of Samuel William Featherstone in the Census on 31 March 1901 Samuel William Featherstone Occupation was a Clergyman C Of England living at Endiaug, Pinhoe, Devonshire, EnglandG.7 In Samuel William Featherstone's will dated 17 September 1908, Jenetta Harrison Hargrave Carroll was named as executor; will
Featherstone Reverend Samuel William of Endiang Pinhoe near Exeterclerk died 17 May 1908 Probate London 17 September to Jennetta Harrison Hargrave Featherstone widow £1117 14s 4d.8
She was the head of household in the Census on 2 April 1911 Jenetta Harrison Hargrave Carroll Occupation was a Widow, son a poultry Farmer living at Endiaug, Pinhoe, Devonshire, EnglandG.9

Family

Samuel William Featherstone b. 20 Jul 1855, d. 17 May 1908
Children
Last Edited10 Aug 2013
ReferenceP7087

Citations

  1. [S876] As per use web image, Church of Jesus Christ Latterday Saints, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America, Ireland, Births and Baptisms, 1620-1911
    Jennette Harrison Hargrave Carroll Birth Date 28 May 1864 Cork, Ireland father Joshua J. Carroll mother Jane Kearns Tannor FHL Film Number: 101089
    Ireland, Civil Registration Births Index, 1864-1958
    Jennette Harrison Hargrave Carroll 1864 Cork Ireland 10 145
    FHL Film Number: 101041.
  2. [S1891] National for England & Wales, "1891 census RG12/1750/124/10
    The Vicarage, Whitchurch, Devon
    Samuel William Featherstone head M 35 vicar of Whitchurch Wiltshire, Marlborough
    Jenetta H H Featherstone wife M 26 Ireland, Cork
    Hargrave C Featherstone son 4 Devon, Whitchurch
    Samuel D Featherstone son 2 Devon, Whitchurch
    Alfred William Daw serv U 26 coachman Cornwall, Torpoint
    Mary Ann Bolt serv U 23 cook Devon, Whitchurch
    Anna Luxton serv U 25 nurse Devon, North Tawton
    Maud Mary May serv U 16 kitchen maid Devon, Lamerton."
  3. [S876] As per use web image, Church of Jesus Christ Latterday Saints, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America, Ireland, Births and Baptisms, 1620-1911
    Jennette Harrison Hargrave Carroll Birth Date 28 May 1864 Cork, Ireland father Joshua J. Carroll mother Jane Kearns Tannor FHL Film Number: 101089
    Ireland, Civil Registration Births Index, 1864-1958
    Jennette Harrison Hargrave Carroll 1864 Cork Ireland 10 145
    FHL Film Number: 101041.
  4. [S1253] Unknown author Ireland, Civil Registration Indexes 1845 - 1958 "https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FY7X-S2J."
  5. [S685] Frederick A. Crisp. (1897-1918) "Family of Carroll" "See Image Visitation of Ireland
    Jannetta, born at Cork 28th May 1864,and Baptised at St Ann's, Shandon, Cork Father Joshua Carroll, mother Jane Kearns
    Married Rev Samuel William Featherstone at Holy Trinity, Cork 11 Sep. 1884
    he was born 26. Jul 1855 B.A. of Durham University, Vicar of Whitechurch Co. Devon."
  6. [S14] Unknown author, Will, Featherstone Jennetta Harrison Hargrave of Endiang Pinhoe near Exeter widow died 18 January 1930 Probate London 11 April to Samuel Dashwood Featherstone gentleman and Cecil Foster solicitor Effects £3148 5s 5d.
  7. [S1901] 31.3.1901 Census filmed, unknown repository address, as per citation, 1901 Census
    RG number: RG13 Piece: 2035 Folio: 24 Page: 22     
    Registration District: St Thomas. Sub District: Heavitree
    Enumeration District: 11. Ecclesiastical Parish: Pinhoe St Michaels
    Civil Parish: Pinhoe
    Address: Endiaug, Pinhoe, Devonshire
    FEATHERSTONE, Samuel William Head Married M 45 1856 Clergyman C Of England Marlborough Wiltshire
    FEATHERSTONE, Jennetta Harrison Hargrave Wife Married F 36 1865 Ireland Cork
    FEATHERSTONE, Samuel Dashwood Son M 12 1889 Whitchurch Devonshire
    MURRAY, Mary La Coste Visitor Single F 22 1879 Walmer Kent
    HOARE, Alma Stuthridge Servant Single F 26 1875 Housemaid (Domestic) Grampound Road Cornwall
    TOMS, Mary Elizabeth Servant Single F 27 1874 Cook (Domestic) St Germans Cornwall.
  8. [S14] Unknown author, Will, will
    Featherstone Reverend Samuel William of Endiang Pinhoe near Exeter clerk died 17 May 1908 Probate London 17 September to Jennetta Harrison Hargrave Featherstone widow £1117 14s 4d.
  9. [S1911] 2009 Census filmed, Room 1.015, Government Buildings, Cardiff Road, Newport, South Wales, as per citation, 1911 Census
    RG number: RG14 Piece: 12624
    Reference: RG14PN12624 RG78PN725 RD270 SD4 ED18 SN4
    Registration District: St Thomas. Sub District: Heavitree
    Enumeration District: 18. Parish: Pinhoe
    Address: Endiang Pinhoe, Devonshire
    FEATHERSTONE, Jennetea H H Head Widow F 46 1865 Cory Ireland
    FEATHERSTONE, Samuel D Son Single M 22 1889 Poultry Farmer Whitchurh Devon
    HIRTZEL, Mabel Heames Sister Spinster F 30 1881 Paris France
    HAM, Lilian Rose Servant Spinster F 25 1886 Covel Domestic Wonford Devon
    HAM, Edith Annie Servant Spinster F 23 1888 House Parlour Maid Domestic Topsham Devon.

Mary Munn

F, #36127, d. 1842
     Mary Munn died in 1842 at Plymouth, Devonshire, EnglandG.
     She will
790-Mary Featherstone 1842 Devon
In the name of God Amen I Mary Featherstone of Plymouth in the countyof Devon widow being in good health of body and of sound and disposingmind memory and understanding Thanks be to God for the same do for aavoiding all converies? after my decease make public and declare thisto be my last will and testament ffirst I recommend my soul to Godwho gave it hoping through the Christ’s ? passion and death of myBlessed Saviour Jesus Christ to obtain everlasting life and my body Icommit to the grave to be decently interred at the discretion of myexecutor and executrix hereinafter named and as to such worldly estatewherewith it hath pleased to bestow upon me I give devise and bequeaththe same as followeth [that is to say]I give and bequeath unto DorothySymons Clatworthy of Plymouth aforesaid spinster niece of my latedeceased husband Samuel ffeatherstone the sum of one hundred poundsand all my wearing apparel also I give and bequeath unto the saidDorothy Symons Clatworthy one moiety or halfpart of my household goodsbooks linen china and furniture of every description [except my silverplate and plated wares ] to and for her own sole use and benefit allthe rest residue & remainder of my household goods and furnituremonies securities for money monies in the public stocks and funds andall other my personal estate and effects whatsoever not hereinbeforeby me given and disposed of I give and bequeath subject to the paymentof my just debts funeral expenses and the charges of proving this mywill in manner in following [that is to say] I give and bequeath onethird part or share thereof unto my sister in law Mary Clatworthy ofPlymouth aforesaid widow one other third part or share thereof unto mysister in law Elizabeth Hawkins wife of Henry Hawkins of Stroud waterin the county of Gloucester Dissenting Minister and the other andremaining one third part or share thereof unto Samuel ffeatherstone ofPlymouth aforesaid a Lieutenant in the Royal Navy and WilliamCharleton ffeatherstone of the city of Exeter printer nephews of mysaid late deceased husband to be equally divided between them shareand share alike and I do direct that the bequests so given by me asaforesaid be paid within six months after my decease I do herebynominate constitute and appoint the said Samuel ffeatherstone andDorothy Symons Clatworthy Executor & executrix of this my last willand testament hereby revoking and making void all former and otherwill or wills by me at anytime heretofore made and I do declare thisonly to be my last will and testament In testimony whereof I the saidMary ffeatherstone the said testatrix have set my hand and seal inmanner following [that is to say ] my hand only to the preceding sheetof paper and my hand and seal to this second and last sheet of paperthe ninth day of May in the year of Our Lord one thousand eighthundred and thirty five Mary Featherstone signed sealed published anddeclared by the said Mary ffeatherstone the testatrix as and for herlast will and testament in the presence of us who at her request inher presence and in the presence of each other have subscribed ournames as witnesses thereto Geo Hunt any? Plym Warwick A Hunt anyPlym

Proved at London 21st February 1842 before the Judge on the oath ofDorothy Symons Clatworthy spinster one of the executors to whomadministration was granted having first sworn by commission only toadminister power reserved of making the like grant to Samuelffeatherstone Esq the other executor when he shall apply for the same. Kent Database; Y. Her married name was Featherstone.
Last Edited20 Mar 2013
ReferenceP6989

William James Woodmass1

M, #36128, b. circa 1874
     William James Woodmass was born circa 1874.1 He married Mary Lizze Featherstonehaugh, daughter of Thomas Featherstonehaugh, on 29 September 1899 at Christchurch, Shieldfield, Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland, EnglandG.1,2 Mary Lizze Featherstonehaugh and William James Woodmass marriage was registered in Newcastle upon Tyne district Vol/Page 10b.134 in the quarter of September 1900.3
Last Edited16 Jun 2017

Citations

  1. [S266] Parish register Microfilm Transcript, As per citation, 1837-1911 "Copy of an entry of marriage in the parish register of Christchurch Shieldfield.
    1900 marriage solemnised the parish church in the parish of Christchurch in the county of Newcastle upon Tyne.
    Entry 426 on 29 September 1900.
    William James Woodmass aged 26 a bachelor a miner of 16 Russell Terrace, father William Woodmass a miner.
    To
    Mary Lizzie Featherstonehaugh aged 25 a spinster and knitter of 16 Russell Terrace father Thomas Featherstonehaugh a labourer.
    Both signed
    in the presence of Thomas Woodmass and Jemima Louisa Bailey.
    After banns."
  2. [S1323] Web site Newcastle Registrars Office, online http://www2.newcastle.gov.uk/msearch.nsf/msearch?openform, 1900 ROBINSON Lily Harriet Jane
    Marriage venue - Christchurch, Shieldfield
    1900 FEATHERSTONEHAUGH Mary Lizzie
    Marriage venue - Christchurch, Shieldfield
    1900 REWCASTLE Aaron
    Marriage venue - Christchurch, Shieldfield
    1900 WOODMESS William James
    Marriage venue - Christchurch, Shieldfield.
  3. [S3] As per use, death registration index.