Joshua Cecil Hubert1

M, #59303, b. 1858, d. 5 May 1935
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA

Family

Mary Josephine Virginia Featherston b. 15 Oct 1869, d. 26 Dec 1962
Children
Last Edited25 Sep 2015

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."

William Phillip McBride1

M, #59304, b. 31 July 1868, d. 19 December 1949
William Phillip McBride 1868-1949 husband of Ida May Featherston
Blanchard Cemetery, Blanchard, McClain County, Oklahoma, USA
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA

Family

Ida May Featherston b. 1 Mar 1876, d. 14 Jun 1961
Last Edited19 Sep 2016

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."

Mittie Arlie Vail1

F, #59305, b. 4 June 1874, d. 12 May 1948
Mittie Arlie Vail 1874-1948 wife of Lucius Cassius Featherston
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA
     Mittie Arlie Vail was born on 4 June 1874 at Indian Territory, Indian Reservation, Atoka, Oklahoma, United States Of AmericaG.1 She married Lucius Cassius Featherston, son of Charles Henry Featherston and Nancy Yarbrough Middlebrook, in 1891 at Atoka, Indian Territory, United States Of AmericaG.1 Mittie Arlie Vail died on 12 May 1948 at Featherston, Pittsburg County, Oklahoma, United States Of AmericaG.1
     As of 1891,her married name was Featherston.1 Choctaw by blood; enrolled in five civilized tribe rolls --enrollment date 25 Sept 1902.1

Family

Lucius Cassius Featherston b. 16 Feb 1861, d. 17 Jun 1917
Children
Last Edited18 Sep 2016

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."

Charles Clayton Featherston1

M, #59306, b. 25 February 1892, d. 20 September 1973
Charles Clayton Featherston 1892-1973 and his wife Bertha E. Owens
Burial:
Oak Hill Memorial Park
McAlester
Pittsburg County
Oklahoma, USA
Plot: Sec. 30
Father*Lucius Cassius Featherston1 b. 16 Feb 1861, d. 17 Jun 1917
Mother*Mittie Arlie Vail1 b. 4 Jun 1874, d. 12 May 1948
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA
     Charles Clayton Featherston was born on 25 February 1892 at Indiana Territory, Oklahoma, United States Of AmericaG.1 He was the son of Lucius Cassius Featherston and Mittie Arlie Vail.1 Charles Clayton Featherston married Bertha E Owens circa 1925.1 Charles Clayton Featherston died on 20 September 1973 at McAlester, Pittsburg County, Oklahoma, United States Of AmericaG.1 He was buried after 20 September 1973 at Oak Hill Memorial Park, McAlester, Pittsburg County, Oklahoma, United States Of AmericaG.1

Family

Bertha E Owens b. 5 Jan 1894, d. 4 Nov 1956
Last Edited16 Jul 2016

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."

Bertha E Owens1

F, #59307, b. 5 January 1894, d. 4 November 1956
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA
     Bertha E Owens was born on 5 January 1894.1 She married Charles Clayton Featherston, son of Lucius Cassius Featherston and Mittie Arlie Vail, circa 1925.1 Bertha E Owens died on 4 November 1956 at McAlester, Pittsburg County, Oklahoma, United States Of AmericaG.1 She was buried after 4 November 1956 at McAlester, Pittsburg County, Oklahoma, United States Of AmericaG.1
     As of circa 1925,her married name was Featherston.1

Family

Charles Clayton Featherston b. 25 Feb 1892, d. 20 Sep 1973
Last Edited21 Sep 2015

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."

Willis Folsom Featherston1

M, #59308, b. 6 December 1893, d. 20 November 1966
Willis Folsom Featherston 1893-1966
Featherston Cemetery, Featherston, Pittsburgh County, Oklahoma, USA
Father*Lucius Cassius Featherston1 b. 16 Feb 1861, d. 17 Jun 1917
Mother*Mittie Arlie Vail1 b. 4 Jun 1874, d. 12 May 1948
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA
     Willis Folsom Featherston was born on 6 December 1893 at Indian Territory, Chickasaw Nation, Oklahoma, United States Of AmericaG.1 He was the son of Lucius Cassius Featherston and Mittie Arlie Vail.1 Willis Folsom Featherston married Clara Gilstrap circa 1920 at United States of AmericaG.1 Willis Folsom Featherston died on 20 November 1966 at Quinton, Pittsburg County, Oklahoma, United States Of AmericaG.1 He was buried after 20 November 1966 at Featherston Cemetery, Featherston, Pittsburg County, Oklahoma, United States Of AmericaG.1

Family

Clara Gilstrap b. 24 Jun 1894, d. 3 Jun 1986
Children
Last Edited19 Oct 2016

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."

Clara Gilstrap1

F, #59309, b. 24 June 1894, d. 3 June 1986
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA
     Clara Gilstrap was born on 24 June 1894 at Stigler, Haskell County, Oklahoma, United States Of AmericaG.1 She married Willis Folsom Featherston, son of Lucius Cassius Featherston and Mittie Arlie Vail, circa 1920 at United States of AmericaG.1 Clara Gilstrap died on 3 June 1986 at Featherston, Pittsburg County, Oklahoma, United States Of AmericaG.1 She was buried after 3 June 1986 at Featherston Cemetery, Featherston, Pittsburg County, Oklahoma, United States Of AmericaG.1
     As of circa 1920,her married name was Featherston.1

Family

Willis Folsom Featherston b. 6 Dec 1893, d. 20 Nov 1966
Children
Last Edited24 Sep 2015

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."

Sarah Sallie Featherston1

F, #59310, b. 31 March 1770, d. 1806
Father*Henry Featherston1 b. 19 Feb 1743, d. 2 Apr 1828
Mother*Elizabeth Marshall1 b. 1753, d. 1815
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA
     Sarah Sallie Featherston was born on 31 March 1770 at Chesterfield County, Virginia, United States Of AmericaG.1 She was the daughter of Henry Featherston and Elizabeth Marshall.1 Sarah Sallie Featherston married Thomas Hardie on 27 October 1791 at Chesterfield County, Virginia, United States Of AmericaG.1 Sarah Sallie Featherston died in 1806 at Mecklenburg County, Virginia, United States Of AmericaG.1
     As of 27 October 1791,her married name was Hardie.1

Family

Thomas Hardie b. 17 Sep 1766, d. 1806
Children
Last Edited25 Sep 2015

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."

Elizabeth Featherston1

F, #59311, b. 27 March 1780, d. 1808
Father*Henry Featherston1 b. 19 Feb 1743, d. 2 Apr 1828
Mother*Elizabeth Marshall1 b. 1753, d. 1815
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA
     Elizabeth Featherston was born on 27 March 1780 at Chesterfield, Chesterfield County, Virginia, United States Of AmericaG.1 She was the daughter of Henry Featherston and Elizabeth Marshall.1 Elizabeth Featherston married John Cogbill on 31 August 1802 at Chesterfield County, Virginia, United States Of AmericaG.1 Elizabeth Featherston died in 1808.1
     As of 31 August 1802,her married name was Cogbill.1

Family

John Cogbill b. 6 Nov 1774
Last Edited22 Sep 2015

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."

Daniel Marshall Featherston1

M, #59312, b. 28 March 1793, d. 2 February 1815
Father*Henry Featherston1 b. 19 Feb 1743, d. 2 Apr 1828
Mother*Elizabeth Marshall1 b. 1753, d. 1815
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA
     Daniel Marshall Featherston was born on 28 March 1793 at Chesterfield, Chesterfield County, Virginia, United States Of AmericaG.1 He was the son of Henry Featherston and Elizabeth Marshall.1 Daniel Marshall Featherston died on 2 February 1815 at Pike County, Mississippi, United States Of AmericaG.1 He was buried after 2 February 1815 at Chalmette National Cemetery, Grave No. 12540, Chalmette, St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana, United States Of AmericaG, Unknown GEDCOM info: n/a
Chalmette National Cemetery, Grave No. 12540, Grav.1
     He began military service circa 1815 Daniel Featherston was a private of Volunteer infantry under Col. James Raulston and Capt. Elijah Haynie. His date of death was listed in his service records. Edward Featherston was administrator of the estate of Daniel M. Featherston, and filed an inventory 13 April 1816 Smith County, Tennessee, which listed open accounts against Henry Featherston, Jr., Edward Featherston, William Holt, and Charles C. Cogbill. Melinda Bailey stated that Daniel Marshall Featherston died as a result of wounds sustained in the Battle of New Orleans, while his brother, Henry died a few days earlier.
Note: according to documentation, Henry was wounded 1 Jan 1815 in a skirmish and died 9 January 1815. Daniel was wounded in the Big Battle on 8 Jan 1815 and died 2 Feb 1915 on way back to Tennessee. A unknown soldier was buried in Pike County, Mississippi and returned to the Chalmette National Cemetery. I believe that soldier to be Daniel.
Garrett, Hester E. Featherston Findings. 4:3, 1991.
Sistler, Byron and Sistler, Samuel. Tenneseeans in the War of 1812. (Nashville: Sistler & Assoc., 1992) p. 191.
Smith Co., Tennessee,Wills & Inventories (1814-1816):198. (WPA transcription).
Bailey, Melinda R. Featherston. (1994) Copy located at Public Library, Murfreesboro,
Tennessee, 25 Aug 2006.

War of 1812
Battle of New Orleans
Who is Buried in the Grave of the Unknown Soldier  #12540
At  Chalmette National Cemetery?
A Tale of Three Featherston Brothers

Cemeteries are generally peaceful, serene places.  Places which should make us aware of our lives and the people in it; as well as, the people who have gone before us.  What legacy did they leave? How can we honor that legacy? What stories can be told about the our ancestors in that place?  We can cherish the memory of those who in early days of our country who stood for Truth and Duty to the United States of America.

My avid interest in matters genealogical and historical, led to the investigation after noting in the battlefield records of the Battle of War of 1812 in New Orleans, Louisiana that three Featherston  brothers had served at the Battle of Chalmette (aka Battle of New Orleans). The records of the Chalmette Battlefield showed that there were two Featherston deaths--Henry who had been wounded on 1 January 1815 and subsequently died on 8 January 1815 and Daniel was wounded on 8 January 1815 and died 2 February 1815 in Mississippi on the way home to Tennessee; the third brother,Edward, survived unscathed.   Daniel was unmarried.  Henry left a widow and children.  Henry's widow received a pension and land grant after the war.

The United States Daughters of the War of 1812 honored  Unknown Soldier #12540  with the 'Wreaths Across America'Program at Chalmette National Cemetery on 15 December 2012 along with three other soldiers from the War of 1812 who were also interred in that cemetery.  Chalmette Cemetery records list the place of residence of Soldier #12540 as Lewis Creek, Tennessee, the area Daniel Featherston and his brothers called home.   It was noted that only one Soldier (Soldier #12540), however, fought in the Battle of New Orleans.   

The story of this Unknown Soldier has taken almost 200 years to be told.  It begins with a Tennessee Soldier of the War of 1812 laying in a lonely grave for ninety-three years in Pike County Mississippi.  In the  1890's, when Mr. Luke Ward Conerly decided to research and write a book about his home county of Pike County, Mississippi.  He was taken to the Soldier's grave by a friend.  Luke was a Historian, Newspaper Editor, Attorney, and a Southern Patriot. A decorated Confederate veteran himself, Luke could not just let the grave continue to be unmarked and unrecognized.  A single family named the Brumfield family had cared for and maintained that gravesite for generations.  Mr. Brumfield's ancestors and others had transmitted to him a knowledge of this grave and he made a point to care forit.  Luke Conerly knew a law had been passed in 1907 re-interring American Soldiers in a new National Cemetery--Chalmette National Cemetery.  Mr. Conerly set to work; generating a mountain of correspondence with the Department of War in Washington, D.C. to honor this soldier. Six responses are recorded in his book; goodness only knows how many he wrote!  What an effort to honor the Soldier.  He was a very determined man!  That effort resulted in the re-interment in Chalmette National Cemetery.

Early in the War of 1812, Andrew Jackson became convinced of the importance of providing New Orleans some means of defense. He had raised questions during September 1811 about that defense. Jackson had been present in the Battles of Mobile and Pensacola which had prevented the British from establishing a land base which would have given the British a foothold on our continent. He was even more certain that the British would attack again.  To his chagrin, Jackson found nothing had been done by the government in Washington to strengthen the New Orleans defenses. 
Jackson arrived in New Orleans on 1 Dec 1814.  He had asked William Carroll of Tennessee to accept a commission as Major General.  Carroll was request to raise a significant number of militia  to help General Jackson in New Orleans.  William Carroll, future governor of the State of Tennessee, gave up his business to join Jackson.  He proved to be one of the most extraordinary soldiers in the effort to save New Orleans and defeat the British.  He performed his task admirably.  Tennessee has since been known as  'The Volunteer State' because of the immediate response of the citizens who volunteered to serve under Maj. Gen. Carroll. 

The hastily formed units under Maj. Gen. Carroll were mustered into service on 15 November 1814 at Camp Flynes, Jackson County,Tennessee.  Carroll raised three regiments.  Among that number were three Featherston brothers--Daniel Marshall Featherston, age 23, Edward Featherston,age 31 and Henry Featherston, M.D., age 40. The three brothers were sons of Henry Featherston and Elizabeth Marshall of Smith County, Tennessee.  Henry, a 1st Sgt. was under the command of Capt. Obadiah Waller and Col. William Metcalf, in the Tennessee Infantry Militia.  Edward served first as a Private under Wynn's command; then as a Sergeant under Hall's command.  He survived the war.  Daniel Featherston, Private, was under the command of Col. James Raulston and Capt. Elijah Haynie.  The men of their unit were mostly from Jackson, Sumner, Wilson, Overton, Smith and White Counties.
One of the Soldiers of this regiment, Levi Lee of Captain Henry West's Company, kept a diary during the war.  A resident of Jackson County, Soldier Levi Lees erved in the regiments of Colonels Steele and Cheatham.  He participated in that  fast trip to New Orleans and subsequent battles.  In Levis Lee's hand written account he describes to journey to New Orleans and their participation in the battle:
'13 November 1814  I started this ?Campaign and on the 21st day we landing at Nashville, and I  joined the Army commanded by William Carroll, Major General.  At Nashville we marched into boats and took our provisions for 60 days and we went on down to Clarksville.  The 24th of November we left Clarksville, on the 26th we went out of the mouth of Cumberland and on the 27thth, we arrived at the mouth of the Ohio. ...........................Wednesday, the 14th we landed at Natchez.  Then Thursday morning we left Natchez and started for the port of New Orleans. At twelve o'clock we passed the white Bluffs and then we had to go to land.  On Tuesday we put out and passed Fort Adams.  Friday ..........................................................Between sundown and ark we keep general order that ??? was seen near that ...and for us to make no delay till we got to Orleans. And we ???/ on about 4 hours in the night and about to run on .................
On the 20th of December we landed at New Orleans.  On Thursday the 22 of December we marched out and pitched our tents. On the 23th we was on General parade and the General came up where we lived and ordered us to march.  We marched and left our knapsacks and blankets and he  marched to the levy where there was some boxes of guns and ammunition. We drew guns and ammunition as we  marched along. And them that has rifles was throwed out of there company and the musketmen marched on.   And they made up a regiment of riflemen.  And again we got bullets event it was after night and then march us onto the battleground. But the battle commenced about dark and continued  some time and they marched us right in between the two armys and we stayed under arms all night and in the morning the General with???army two miles and left us standing there and at the sunrise then moved us ??? and the General  formed his breast works at first.  It was a row of picketts and we got some to it on Sunday which is Christmas day.  We prepared for battle helf the day and have nothing to eat until evening on Monday the 26th of December.  We still made preparations for battle and the horsemen went and fired at them everday since the battle commenced.  Tues the 27th of December the cannon begun at daylight and fired til the dark again.  .................On Satturday, Dec 31st, the play begins as usual with cannons and the picketguards and volunteers with their small arms took one prisoner and killed soomand on the same night they moved nearer us and bilt a battery for there Cannon,on New Year's day about 9 o'clock the British Cannon are trained our lines thenthe Commencement of the Cannon by ??? ???? and the British let loop thire Cannon and Rockets like hale as it ware but to no purpose; thire Boles generally went over us and thir rockets generly was over to and some of them went a hundred yard high apparently.  The Battle lasts till evening and one of the??? every day till Satterday. 

The journal continues with entries about the continuous cannon fire.  Volunteer parties suffered some loss of life almost daily but minimally. Mostly the Tennesseans and others frustrated the British with their hit-and-run tactics. The British still used the old outdated, European methods of fighting.  They used large units of massed soldiers.  They would stand in the open field; (unprotected from the Americans) firing together, by ranks (rows).  The British were using obsolete smooth bore muskets.  These muskets only had an effective killing range of about 50 yards. 

The British believed that 'discipline' was what made a 'good' officer.  The individual soldier was not supposed to think.  He was supposed to only do what his officers told him to do.  The soldiers were taught that the first rank only fired on order of the officer on the end of their rank.  Then they squatted down while the rank behind hem fired.  This limits the total rounds fired from the unit in a given amount of time. If the officer of that rank was shot, injured or killed, that rank, and the ones behind it, might stand there paralyzed.  They were not allowed to take any initiative on their own.  They stood there, in ranks(rows) massed in formations (like sitting ducks!) until they were either wounded, killed, or ran out of ammunition. Their casualties were awful.

By contrast, the Americans had learned, by their fighting experiences with the Indians, to get behind some protection.  In this case, the cotton bales or the hastily constructed rampart behind the picket fence as described by Levi Lee.  Once they had protection, then they could fire on their own initiative after the initial order to fire.  Fewer officers were require to manage the fighting.  If an officer was disabled, a volunteer soldier from the ranks took his place.  They were more of an 'organized mob' than a formation of line soldiers. One account describes how the women of New Orleans made 'uniforms' for them from blankets--the only material available.  The rate of fire of the Americans only depended on how long it took the individual soldiers to reload and fire again.  No one had to wait until given an order from an officer.  This significantly increased the effective firepower of the unit.

The Americans had developed 'Kentucky Rifles' with rifled barrels (square groves were cut in a spiral (helical) form, like a corkscrew, in the inside of the gun barrel). The metal remaining, after the grooves had been cut, appeared as raised 'tracks' for the bullet to follow causing the bullet to spin.  This spinning mode made the bullets more stable. These 'rifled' weapons were accurate for several hundred yards, making them much more effective, with greater accuracy which allowed the Americans to wound and kill the British Soldiers at long range before the British were close enough to fire back!
On 1 January 1815, Pakenham ordered his artillery to try to silence the American guns and break through the rampart.  Pakenham brought his gun up to about seven hundred years from the American line.  A terrible fight ensued.  By noon, the British guns were completely silenced. This is the day Henry is injured but does not succumb (die) until 6 January 1815.

The day of 8 January 1815 dawns--it is cold, damp and visibility is very low.  Pakenham tried to take advantage of the dark and fog;  as a result his troops forgot to bring scaling ladders and other equipment to throw in the ditches to help climb to the top of the ramparts.  This is the day Pakenham was killed.  But also wounded was Daniel Marshall Featherston.

Levi Lee's account:
'January the 8th, 1815, the battle commenced about daylight and the small arms continued firing and it was about 11 or 12 o'clock when the cannon began firing we  had 7 men killed and 7 wounded which made 13 killed and wounded in all and we killed 25 hundred of the British so great a difference has been found until this day.' 

GeneralCarroll's report of the battle tells that Captains Elijah Haynie and Matthew Neal 'had the honor of receiving and repelling the attacks of the British forces.'

Latour,Arsène Lacarrière, 1778-1837 , a French-born engineer, soldier and historian wrote of Carroll's Tennessee Militiamen  ' The Tennesseans, on account of their well-known skill at the rifle, were the terror of the British Sentinels and advanced posts.  Their uniform consisted of a brown hunting shirt (because of this, the British called them'dirty shirts') which rendered it difficult to perceive them among the underwood and dry grass through when they approached to shoot down the British sentinels, whom they never missed. Finally, when the dawn of the 8th of Jan arrived, the Tennesseans discovered the enemy occupying the space between the woods and the Mississippi.  The British having perceived that the left part of Jackson's line was weak, Carroll's Tennesseans would bear the brunt of the attack.  Ont heir first charge the British were met by a withering volley from Carroll's men, and the British took to their heels and fled.  Then Carroll's men were attacked by Scottish Highlanders.  Again the Tennesseans showed no respect for their enemy and opened a murderous fire upon the Highlanders.  The whole line from Carroll's Tennesseans to the swamp was almost one solid blaze.  Four men deep, the ranks of the Tennesseans never stopped for breath.  As fast as one man fired he stepped back for the next to take his place.  By the time the fourth line had discharged its rifles, the first was taking aim again. There were barely fifteen hundred in the line yet scarcely a rifle failed to find its mark. '

Levi Lee continued--
'in the evening they sent in a flag of true to get leave to burry their dead and it was granted them.  And we took 56 of the British as spies.  They came..the breastworks without arms and their excuse was that wanted to borrow spades and(machetes) to bury their dead and they was guarded to town and put in the guardhouse and was kept there until they was exchanged.
January 9th,we carried there dead and they buried them.................................On the 15th of January a deserter came in and told that ???something had spked their cannon and was a building a battery to make safe retreat on the 18th we changed prisoners on the 19th the British retreated from the camp .  On the 22nd, we marched from the breastwork to Camp Henderson which is about 3 miles above Orleans which made our hearts glad to think that we got out of that mess at once and where we were not to getup 3 or 4 times a night and where we had to stand half the night duty which was enough to make us glad to get released from this place.'

Fearing diseases,especially cholera, General Jackson ordered the men back from the battlefield on January 21, 1914 .  Some went to Ft.Henderson as did the writer of the journal and others began their long trek home.  Some lingered in camps until 15 March.  Many who survived the battle succumbed to the multiplicity of deadly diseases that permeated the camps after the battle. 

On Saturday the 8th of February Levi told of a trial of a deserter and subsequent execution and on the same day they were required to make a statement of the drawn property of money, guns and clothing. They washed their clothing and other possessions and  put in boxes to ship to Nashville so friends and family  could collect. 

The Sistlers in their book, 'Tennesseans in the War of 1812 attempted to list all persons who served in Tennessee units during the War of 1812.  Information was taken from the so-called'Service Records' which consist of a typewritten card file which is available on microfilm at the Tennessee State Library and Archives.  The card files, in turn,  was produced from Photostats of the original muster rolls.  Very few of these records indicated place of residence.  The listings were examined carefully to eliminate other possibilities for thei dentify of unknown soldier. Officers' accounts of the battles, some of which listed dead and wounded under their commands, listed no other possible candidates for Soldier # 12540.  
On  '13 Feb 1816,on motion, Edward Featherston, was appointed Administrator of the estate of Danl. Featherston, dec'd., who qualified together with Samuel Britton his security entered into bond in the sum of Two thousand dollars, conditioned as the law directs.'  The papers indicate that twenty dollars was due from the United States.  Edward was Daniel's older brother who survived the war.  It can be reasonably surmised that after the death of Henry on the 9th  of January, Edward is permitted to return home with his wounded brother to Tennessee prior to the large body of troops being returned home. 

So can the family tale told for generations of the burial of Daniel Marshall Featherston as the Soldier residing in the grave of the unknown Soldier from the Battle of New Orleans actually be proven to be true?  Only DNA analysis will definitely that this is the Unknown Soldier from the Battle of New Orleans, is indeed Daniel Marshall Featherston.  Some human teeth were obtained when the grave was relocated from Mississippi to the Chalmette National Cemetery.  Identification of this soldier's identity might finally be made after all of these long years for this soldier and his family.   In the meantime, we reasonably conclude that  the unknown soldier is Private Daniel Marshall Featherston of Tennessee.   May he rest in peace, as well as his family for generations past and those to come in the future. 
 

 
Sources:
1. Conerly,Luke Ward:  Pike County Mississippi1798-1876 : Pioneer Families and Confederate Soldiers Reconstruction andRedemption, Brandon Printing Company, Nashville, Tennessee, 1909, pp. 14-24
2. Chalmette National CemeteryHeadstone Condition Assessment database, Grave database and map, Grave 12540, Section 23.
3. Sistler,Byron and Samuel D.: Tennesseans in the War of 1812, Byron Sistler &Associates, 1991. 549p.
4. ArseneLacarriere Latour: Historical Memoir of the War in West Florida andLouisiana in 1814-1815. Philadelphia: John Conrad and Co., 1816.
5. The Daily Picayune, New Orleans , 17 December 1905 wrotea feature article entitled 'Writing a History of Pike County--Luke W.Conerly is Preparing a Valuable Historical Work'. 
6.  TheTimes Picayune, New Orleans, 3 January 2013 by AlisonSchroeder.  Posted on www.nola.com blog.
6. LeviLee's Diary, 1813-1831,Manuscript Files, Box M-27, AC#1549, The State Library and Archives 403 SeventhAvenue North, Nashville, TN 37243-0312
7. Henderson,Cora Norton, The Military and Political Career of William Carroll,George Peabody College for Teachers, Nashville, Tennessee 1930.  p. 63.
8. fold3:  War of 1812 Service Records Index www.fold3.com/image/#307542664
9.Smith Co., TNWill Bk. I. 1815-1816. p. 198, lists the inventory ofDaniel's  estate. Court Minute Bk. #6, 1815-1817, p. 68, 'date Tuesday morning,13 Feb 1816, on motion, Edward Featherston, was appointed Administrator of theestate of Danl. Featherston, dec'd., who qualified together with Samuel Brittonhis security entered into bond in the sum of Two thousand dollars, conditionedas the law directs.' Edward was Daniel's brother.


10. Moore,Mrs. John Trotwood Moore, Record of Commissions of Officers in the TennesseeMilitia 1796-1815.  GenealogicalPublishing Company Baltimore 1977; reprinted 15 Jul 2013.
11. Palmer ,Thomas. H. The Historical Register of the United States, Volume 4, Part2.pp. 288, p. 184
 
 
 
About the authors:  E. Elaine Featherston Boston,a Featherston descendant and researcher. Elaine is a member of the Daughters of the Colonial Dames of the 17th Century, Daughters of the American Revolution, US Daughters of the War of 1812,Descendants of Washington's Army at Valley Forge,  National Society of the Dames of the Court of Honor; various other historical and genealogical societies and Le Comite des Archives de la Louisiana. 
 Lee Jackson, gggrandson of Luke WardConerly.  Lee has been instrumental inre-publishing his grandfathers book about Pike County, Mississippi and is  available at www.lukewardconerly.com
 

USDaughters of the War of 1812 marker on Military Road, Covington, Louisiana.1
 
Last Edited16 Oct 2016

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."

Lucy Ann Featherston1

F, #59313, b. 30 November 1819, d. 19 September 1863
Father*Edward W Featherston1 b. 20 Jan 1796, d. 19 Nov 1857
Mother*Rebecca Wilcox Alston1 b. 17 Feb 1799, d. 27 Apr 1890
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA
     Lucy Ann Featherston was born on 30 November 1819 at Georgia, United States Of AmericaG.1 She was the daughter of Edward W Featherston and Rebecca Wilcox Alston.1 Lucy Ann Featherston married Clard Boone circa 1840 at United States of AmericaG.1 Lucy Ann Featherston died on 19 September 1863 at Hamilton County, Tennessee, United States Of AmericaG, aged Civil War Chickamauga, Hamilton County, Tennessee.1
     As of circa 1840,her married name was Boone.1

Family

Clard Boone b. c 1815
Last Edited25 Sep 2015

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."

Mary Elizabeth Featherston1

F, #59314, b. 25 November 1821, d. 24 September 1895
Father*Edward W Featherston1 b. 20 Jan 1796, d. 19 Nov 1857
Mother*Rebecca Wilcox Alston1 b. 17 Feb 1799, d. 27 Apr 1890
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA
     Mary Elizabeth Featherston was born on 25 November 1821 at Georgia, United States Of AmericaG.1 She was the daughter of Edward W Featherston and Rebecca Wilcox Alston.1 Mary Elizabeth Featherston married James Hillhouse Baskin on 14 October 1845 at Chickasaw County, Mississippi, United States Of AmericaG.1 Mary Elizabeth Featherston died on 24 September 1895 at Buena Vista, Chickawaw County, Mississippi, United States Of AmericaG.1
     As of 14 October 1845,her married name was Baskin.1

Family

James Hillhouse Baskin b. 3 Apr 1822, d. 7 May 1885
Children
Last Edited25 Sep 2015

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."

James Edward Featherston1

M, #59315, b. 1826
Father*Edward W Featherston1 b. 20 Jan 1796, d. 19 Nov 1857
Mother*Rebecca Wilcox Alston1 b. 17 Feb 1799, d. 27 Apr 1890
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA
     James Edward Featherston was born in 1826 at Georgia, United States Of AmericaG.1 He was the son of Edward W Featherston and Rebecca Wilcox Alston.1 James Edward Featherston married Angeline C Mayberry on 4 July 1859 at Prairie County, Arkansas, United States Of AmericaG.1

Family

Angeline C Mayberry b. c 1843
Last Edited21 Sep 2015

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."

Lucius P Featherston1

M, #59316, b. 1834, d. 19 September 1863
Lucius P. Featherston 1834-1863
Marietta Confederate Cemetery, Marietta, Cobb County, Georgia, USA.
Father*Edward W Featherston1 b. 20 Jan 1796, d. 19 Nov 1857
Mother*Rebecca Wilcox Alston1 b. 17 Feb 1799, d. 27 Apr 1890
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA
     Lucius P Featherston was born in 1834 at Georgia, United States Of AmericaG.1 He was the son of Edward W Featherston and Rebecca Wilcox Alston.1 Lucius P Featherston died on 19 September 1863 at Hamilton County, Tennessee, United States Of AmericaG, aged Unknown GEDCOM info: Battle of Chicamauga.1 He was buried after 19 September 1863 at Marietta Confederate Cemetery, Marietta, Cobb County, Georgia, United States Of AmericaG.1
     He began military service in 1861 at United States of AmericaG Tin-type (can't spell the other) was available on a historical pictures for quite some significant amount of money. He was a Colonel in the 5th Arkansas Infantry and was killed at the battle of Chickamaugh on 19 Sept 1863.
Education:
1854: Graduated from University of Mississippi
Occupation before War:
Attorney in Clarendon Monroe County Arkansas
Civil War Career:
1861: Major of Arkansas State Troops during Battle of Wilson's Creek
1861 – 1862: Captain of Company F 5th Arkansas Infantry Regiment
1862 – 1863: Colonel of 5th Arkansas Infantry Regiment
1863: Killed in battle during the Battle of Chickamauga Georgia

Died: September 19, 1863

Place of Death: Chickamauga Georgia

Age at time of Death: 28 or 29 years old


Original Burial Place: Chickamauga Battlefield

Burial Place: Confederate Cemetery Marietta Georgia 

 
Burial:
Marietta Confederate Cemetery.1
Last Edited18 Sep 2016

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."

William A Featherston1

M, #59317, b. 1834, d. 23 December 1857
Father*Edward W Featherston1 b. 20 Jan 1796, d. 19 Nov 1857
Mother*Rebecca Wilcox Alston1 b. 17 Feb 1799, d. 27 Apr 1890
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA
     William A Featherston was born in 1834 at Georgia, United States Of AmericaG.1 He was the son of Edward W Featherston and Rebecca Wilcox Alston.1 William A Featherston died on 23 December 1857 at Monroe County, Mississippi, United States Of AmericaG.1 He was buried after 23 December 1857 at Camargo Cemetery, Nettleton, Monroe County, Mississippi, United States Of AmericaG.1
Last Edited26 Sep 2015

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."

Ethel Rebecca Featherston1

F, #59318, b. 1835
Father*Edward W Featherston1 b. 20 Jan 1796, d. 19 Nov 1857
Mother*Rebecca Wilcox Alston1 b. 17 Feb 1799, d. 27 Apr 1890
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA
     Ethel Rebecca Featherston was born in 1835 at Georgia, United States Of AmericaG.1 She was the daughter of Edward W Featherston and Rebecca Wilcox Alston.1
Last Edited16 Apr 2013

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."

Thomas Alston Featherston1

M, #59319, b. 1823, d. 23 December 1851
Father*Edward W Featherston1 b. 20 Jan 1796, d. 19 Nov 1857
Mother*Rebecca Wilcox Alston1 b. 17 Feb 1799, d. 27 Apr 1890
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA
     Thomas Alston Featherston was born in 1823 at Chickasaw County, Mississippi, United States Of AmericaG.1 He was the son of Edward W Featherston and Rebecca Wilcox Alston.1 Thomas Alston Featherston died on 23 December 1851 at Monroe County, Mississippi, United States Of AmericaG.1
Last Edited9 Jan 2015

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."

David P Hannis1

M, #59320, b. 1792
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA
     David P Hannis was born in 1792.1 He married Berinthia Melinda Featherston, daughter of Charles Featherston and Lucy Pitts, on 16 December 1819 at Rutherford County, Tennessee, United States Of AmericaG.1

Family

Berinthia Melinda Featherston b. 15 May 1802, d. 15 Jan 1887
Last Edited21 Sep 2015

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."

John McMurry1

M, #59321, b. 18 October 1810, d. 29 February 1884
John McMurry 1810-1884, husband of Berinthia Melinda Featherston
Oakwood Cemetery, Carrollton, Carroll County, Georgia, USA.
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA

Family

Berinthia Melinda Featherston b. 15 May 1802, d. 15 Jan 1887
Children
Last Edited18 Sep 2016

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."

Mary Elizabeth McMurry1

F, #59322, b. 20 October 1834, d. 10 September 1916
Father*John McMurry1 b. 18 Oct 1810, d. 29 Feb 1884
Mother*Berinthia Melinda Featherston1 b. 15 May 1802, d. 15 Jan 1887
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA
     Mary Elizabeth McMurry was born on 20 October 1834 at Gibson County, Tennessee, United States Of AmericaG.1 She was the daughter of John McMurry and Berinthia Melinda Featherston.1 Mary Elizabeth McMurry died on 10 September 1916 at Shelby County, Kentucky, United States Of AmericaG.1
Last Edited16 Apr 2013

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."

Malinda Francis McMurry1

F, #59323, b. 5 January 1837, d. 16 August 1894
Malinda Frances McMurry 1837-1894, daughter of Berinthia Melinda Featherston
Oakwood Cemetery, Carrollton, Carroll County, Georgia, USA.
Father*John McMurry1 b. 18 Oct 1810, d. 29 Feb 1884
Mother*Berinthia Melinda Featherston1 b. 15 May 1802, d. 15 Jan 1887
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA
     Malinda Francis McMurry was born on 5 January 1837 at West, Haywood County, Tennessee, United States Of AmericaG.1 She was the daughter of John McMurry and Berinthia Melinda Featherston.1 Malinda Francis McMurry died on 16 August 1894 at Carrollton, Carroll County, Georgia, United States Of AmericaG.1 She was buried after 16 August 1894 at Oakwood Cemetery, Carrollton, Carroll County, Georgia, United States Of AmericaG.1
Last Edited18 Sep 2016

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."

Frushia McMurry1

F, #59324, b. 18 June 1848, d. 4 February 1884
Frushia McMurray 1848-1884
Oakwood Cemetery, Carrollton, Carroll County, Georgia, USA
Father*John McMurry1 b. 18 Oct 1810, d. 29 Feb 1884
Mother*Berinthia Melinda Featherston1 b. 15 May 1802, d. 15 Jan 1887
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA
     Frushia McMurry was born on 18 June 1848 at Carrollton, Carroll County, Georgia, United States Of AmericaG.1 She was the daughter of John McMurry and Berinthia Melinda Featherston.1 Frushia McMurry died on 4 February 1884 at Carrollton, Carroll County, Georgia, United States Of AmericaG.1 She was buried after 4 February 1884 at Oakwood Cemetery, Carrollton, Carroll County, Georgia, United States Of AmericaG.1
Last Edited17 Sep 2016

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."

William Pickney McMurry1

M, #59325, b. 27 August 1839, d. 29 May 1864
Father*John McMurry1 b. 18 Oct 1810, d. 29 Feb 1884
Mother*Berinthia Melinda Featherston1 b. 15 May 1802, d. 15 Jan 1887
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA
     William Pickney McMurry was born on 27 August 1839 at Haywood County, Tennessee, United States Of AmericaG.1 He was the son of John McMurry and Berinthia Melinda Featherston.1 William Pickney McMurry died on 29 May 1864 at Richmond County, Virginia, United States Of AmericaG.1 He was buried after 29 May 1864 at Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Richmond City, Virginia, United States Of AmericaG.2
Last Edited5 Oct 2016

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."
  2. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "Note: , Date Of Burial :, Confederate Soldier State : Mississippi Regiment : 11th , Ref: Cemetery Records."

George Washington Featherston1

M, #59326, b. 5 November 1829, d. 12 October 1903
Death Certificate George Washington Featherston 1829-1903
Father*William Grandison Featherston1 b. 1807, d. 10 Dec 1873
Mother*Isabelle (Unknown)1 b. c 1810
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA
     George Washington Featherston was born on 5 November 1829 at Crawford County, Arkansas, United States Of AmericaG.1 He was the son of William Grandison Featherston and Isabelle (Unknown).1 George Washington Featherston married Mary Ann Minerva Appleby on 17 February 1851 at Washington County, Arkansas, United States Of AmericaG.1 George Washington Featherston died on 12 October 1903 at Marlow, Stephens County, Oklahoma, United States Of AmericaG.1 He was buried after 12 October 1903 at Marlow Cemetery, Marlow, Stephens County, Oklahoma, United States Of AmericaG.1
     George was a farmer and he was also a Confederate Officer in the Civil War. He was hung three times but survived. He is listed as a Chaplain on the Confederate Rolls. He lived in Arkansas and Indian Territory.
        
The head of this Featherston family was George W. Featherston, father of our subject, a prominent citizen of Scott county, a lawyer and a farmer, born in Arkansas in 1829, accompanied his son to Texas, to New Mexico and back to Texas, where he died. He abandoned the law when he left Arkansas and followed rural and other kindred pursuits in Texas and New Mexico. He was an educated gentleman, was descended from a pioneer of his native state, his father, William G. Featherston, having been one of the four first settlers of Scott county.William G. Featherston was born in Tennessee, settled in Scott county, Arkansas, in early manhood, and it was in his barn that the first session of the county court was held. He became well and widely known, and one of the conspicuous, prominent characters of the county. He died in 1868 at the age of sixty years, being the father of seven children, George W., Robert H., Frank M., M. D., and Richard H. being the sons. George W. Featherston married Mary Ann Appleby, a daughter of Hezekiah Appleby,  who married a young wife in Tennessee and brought her to Arkansas on horseback, carrying their baggage and camping outfit with them. He became a farmer, was ruined financially by the Civil war, and died in Upshur county, Texas, whither he refugeed during the war. Mrs. George W. Featherston died in San Marcial, New Mexico, in 1884, being the mother of: Robert B., our subject; Isabel, deceased in Jones county, Texas, married  James Grayum; William H., of Clay county; Mollie, wife of J. W. Hyden, of the Chickasaw Nation; Emma C., who married Alexander Laird, of San Bernardino, California; Charles H., of Denver, Colorado;  Georgia, widow of Rev. Boone Keston, Marlow, Indian Territory; Eddie, wife of Dr. Barns, of Marlow, Indian Territory.1

Family

Mary Ann Minerva Appleby b. 24 Oct 1836, d. 30 May 1883
Children
Last Edited17 Sep 2016

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."

Robert M Featherston1

M, #59327, b. 1834
Father*William Grandison Featherston1 b. 1807, d. 10 Dec 1873
Mother*Isabelle (Unknown)1 b. c 1810
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA
     Robert M Featherston was born in 1834 at Crawford County, Arkansas, United States Of AmericaG.1 He was the son of William Grandison Featherston and Isabelle (Unknown).1 Robert M Featherston married Susan Elizabeth Gaines on 10 June 1857 at Parks, Scott County, Arkansas, United States Of AmericaG.1 Robert M Featherston married Anna (Unknown) circa 1874 at United States of AmericaG.1

Family 1

Susan Elizabeth Gaines b. 21 Jan 1840, d. 13 Feb 1866
Child

Family 2

Anna (Unknown) b. 1852
Children
Last Edited29 Sep 2015

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."

Francis Marshall Featherston1

M, #59328, b. 1838, d. 15 December 1887
Father*William Grandison Featherston1 b. 1807, d. 10 Dec 1873
Mother*Elizabeth F Thompson1 b. 1818, d. 1862
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA
     Francis Marshall Featherston was born in 1838 at Waldron, Scott County, Arkansas, United States Of AmericaG.1 He was the son of William Grandison Featherston and Elizabeth F Thompson.1 Francis Marshall Featherston married Martha E Smyth on 29 December 1867 at Scott County, Arkansas, United States Of AmericaG, Inscribed on wedding announcement, T. J. Smythe wrote in part: 'Our beloved friend Mattie is now a bride... Our best wishes are for the prosperity of our friends as they go hand in hand...'. Is is a cousin, brother or father?1 Francis Marshall Featherston died on 15 December 1887 at California, United States Of AmericaG.1
     As of after 1838, Francis Marshall Featherston also went by the name of Frank Featherston.1 He began military service circa 1860 Francis, a Medical Doctor, was a Civil War 2nd Lieut/Asst Surgeon in 1st Creek Arkansas Regiment, which his half-brother, George commanded. His wife drew a Confederate pension from Arkansas. 19th Infantry, Dawson Infantry. Registered to vote in Tulare California in 1886. Reported to be buried in Catholic Cemetery in (Trump)? California.
Source: death/burial information on back of his picture: Civil War Muster Records, national Archives, Washington, D.C.1

Family

Martha E Smyth b. 1844, d. 27 Jul 1930
Last Edited23 Sep 2015

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."

Nancy J Featherston1

F, #59329, b. 1842, d. 1899
Father*William Grandison Featherston1 b. 1807, d. 10 Dec 1873
Mother*Elizabeth F Thompson1 b. 1818, d. 1862
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA
     Nancy J Featherston was born in 1842 at Waldron, Scott County, Arkansas, United States Of AmericaG.1 She was the daughter of William Grandison Featherston and Elizabeth F Thompson.1 Nancy J Featherston married Ruben C Reed in 1858 at United States of AmericaG.1 Nancy J Featherston married Jacob Walter Crow in 1866.1 Nancy J Featherston died in 1899.1
     As of 1858,her married name was Reed.1

Family 1

Ruben C Reed b. Feb 1821, d. 21 Jun 1865
Children

Family 2

Jacob Walter Crow b. 1841, d. 18 Oct 1900
Last Edited25 Sep 2015

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."

Phoebe H Featherston1

F, #59330, b. December 1843, d. 1910
Phoebe H. Featherston 1843-1910 wife of John Aaron Spencer 1832-1904
Rose Hill Cemetery, Arkadelphia, Clark County, Arkansas, USA.
Father*William Grandison Featherston1 b. 1807, d. 10 Dec 1873
Mother*Elizabeth F Thompson1 b. 1818, d. 1862
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA
     Phoebe H Featherston was born in December 1843 at Waldron, Scott County, Arkansas, United States Of AmericaG.1 She was the daughter of William Grandison Featherston and Elizabeth F Thompson.1 Phoebe H Featherston married John Arron Spencer circa 1867.1 Phoebe H Featherston died in 1910 at Clark County, Arkansas, United States Of AmericaG.1 She was buried in 1910 at Rose Hill Cemetery, Arkadelphia, Clark County, Arkansas, United States Of AmericaG.1
     Pheobe limped until the day she died from being shot in the hip by Union Troops (or bushwhackers) who were trying to find out where her father buried his gold.1 As of circa 1867,her married name was Spencer.1

Family

John Arron Spencer b. 6 Aug 1832, d. 28 Jan 1904
Children
Last Edited18 Sep 2016

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."

Harriet Thompson Featherston1

F, #59331, b. 8 November 1845, d. 2 February 1911
Harriet Thompson Ellington nee Featherston 1845-1911
Ellington Cemetery, Magazine, Logan County, Arkansas, USA.
Father*William Grandison Featherston1 b. 1807, d. 10 Dec 1873
Mother*Elizabeth F Thompson1 b. 1818, d. 1862
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA
     Harriet Thompson Featherston was born on 8 November 1845 at Waldron, Scott County, Arkansas, United States Of AmericaG.1 She was the daughter of William Grandison Featherston and Elizabeth F Thompson.1 Harriet Thompson Featherston married Nathan Mitchell Ellington on 13 November 1867 at Clark County, Arkansas, United States Of AmericaG.1 Harriet Thompson Featherston died on 2 February 1911 at Magazine, Logan County, Arkansas, United States Of AmericaG.1 She was buried after 2 February 1911 at Ellington Cemetery, Magazine, Logan County, Arkansas, United States Of AmericaG.1
     As of after 8 November 1845, Harriet Thompson Featherston was also known as Hattie Featherston.1 As of 13 November 1867,her married name was Ellington.1

Family

Nathan Mitchell Ellington b. 20 Jan 1840, d. 3 Jun 1921
Children
Last Edited17 Sep 2016

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."

Richard Henry Featherston1

M, #59332, b. 4 October 1847, d. 9 April 1926
Father*William Grandison Featherston1 b. 1807, d. 10 Dec 1873
Mother*Elizabeth F Thompson1 b. 1818, d. 1862
ChartsCharles cir 1637 England then USA
     Richard Henry Featherston was born on 4 October 1847 at Waldron, Scott County, Arkansas, United States Of AmericaG.1 He was the son of William Grandison Featherston and Elizabeth F Thompson.1 Richard Henry Featherston married Virginia C Carder on 30 December 1873 at Clark County, Arkansas, United States Of AmericaG.1 Richard Henry Featherston died on 9 April 1926 at Arkansas, United States Of AmericaG.1

Family

Virginia C Carder b. Oct 1847
Children
Last Edited25 Sep 2015

Citations

  1. [S1765] GEDCOM file created by E. Elaine Boston, 2014 "unknown cd."